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My teacher told me that basically whenever we had a loop and a nested loop the number of operation was as follows n(n+1)/2.

However, I looked at some programs and I realized that it's unlikely to be the case.

for(i=0, i<n, n++)
 for(j=i, j<n, j++)
 {x=i+j}

in this case it would be n(n+1)/2, ignoring i=0, j=0, n++, j++ and x=i+j, but here:

for(i=0, i<n, n++)
 for(j=0, j<n, j++)
 {x=i+j}

it would be n^n unless i am mistaken.

Can someone tell me exactly when two loops have n(n+1)/2 number of operations? I am kinda confused right now.

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2  
Your teacher made a hasty generalization. The run time of two nested loops can be virtually anything. –  nneonneo May 9 '13 at 2:17
    
Wow, that escalated quickly! I think you mean n^2, not n^n. –  Juan Lopes May 9 '13 at 3:14

3 Answers 3

In your first example, the operation would be done n times, then n-1 times, then n-2 times. If I remember correctly, this is n(n-1)/2, but you could be right and it's n(n+1)/2. Either way, it's a very small difference.

In your second example, it would be done n times, then n times, then n times... until you've done it n times n times -- in other words, n^2.

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You probably misunderstood the teacher (or the teacher made a mistake). n(n-1)/2 is just one example of a common loop runtime. It can be anything as you've observed. Your second example has n^2 operations though, another common pattern. 'n^n' is much rarer.

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for(i=0, i<n, n++)
 for(j=0, j<n, j++)
 {x=i+j}

First loop runs n times and for each iteration you run second loop n times, thus you have n*n = n^2.

for(i=0, i<n, n++)
 for(j=i, j<n, j++)
 {x=i+j}

First loop runs n times and for each iteration you run the second loop (n-i) times....thus number of times x=i+j is getting executed is 1 + 2 + 3 ..... + n times, this sequence is sum of first n integers, which is same as n(n+1)/2

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