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I'm reading 'Gray Hat Python.'

There's an example where we get the thread of the process and dump all the register values.

I copied down the source from the book, and it won't work.

Here's a part of the source that I think is the trouble.

def run(self):
    # Now we have to poll the debuggee for debugging events

    while self.debugger_active == True:
        self.get_debug_event()

def get_debug_event(self):

    debug_event     = DEBUG_EVENT()
    continue_status = DBG_CONTINUE

    if kernel32.WaitForDebugEvent(byref(debug_event), INFINITE):

        # We aren't going to build any event handlers
        # just yet. Let's just resume the process for now.
        # raw_input("Press a key to continue...")
        # self.debugger_active = False
        kernel32.ContinueDebugEvent(debug_event.dwProcessId, debug_event.dwThreadId, continue_status)

These two lines were used for previous examples and were commented out in this one.

# raw_input("Press a key to continue...")
# self.debugger_active = False

These two lines were commented out The problem is when self.debugger_active is True, it runs through the WaitForDebugEvent and ContinueDebugEvent.

But do not open thread or anything. It just runs 39 times which I have no idea why.

Here is the full source.

from ctypes import *
from my_debugger_defines import *

kernel32 = windll.kernel32

class debugger():

    def __init__(self):
        self.h_process          = None
        self.pid                = None
        self.debugger_active    = False

    def load(self, path_to_exe):


        # dwCreation flag determines how to create the process
        # set creation_flags = CREATE_NEW_CONSOLE if you want
        # to see the calculator GUI
        creation_flags = DEBUG_PROCESS

        # instantiate the structs
        startupinfo         = STARTUPINFO()
        process_information = PROCESS_INFORMATION()

        # The following two options allow the started process
        # to be shown as a separate window. This also illustrates
        # how different settings in the STARTUPINFO struct can affect the debuggee
        startupinfo.dwFlags     = 0x1
        startupinfo.wShowWindow = 0x0

        # We then initialize the cb variable in the STARTUPINFO struct
        # which is just the size of the struct itself
        startupinfo.cb = sizeof(startupinfo)

        if kernel32.CreateProcessA(path_to_exe,
                                   None,
                                   None,
                                   None,
                                   None,
                                   creation_flags,
                                   None,
                                   None,
                                   byref(startupinfo),
                                   byref(process_information)):

            print "[*] We have successfully launched the process!"
            print "[*] PID: %d" % process_information.dwProcessId

            # Obtain a valid handle to the newly created process
            # and store it for future access

            self.h_process = self.open_process(process_information.dwProcessId)

        else:
            print "[*] Error: 0x%08x." % kernel32.GetLastError()

    def open_process(self, pid):

        h_process = kernel32.OpenProcess(PROCESS_ALL_ACCESS, pid, False)
        return h_process

    def attach(self, pid):

        self.h_process = self.open_process(pid)

        # We attempt to attach to the process
        # if this fails we exit the call
        if kernel32.DebugActiveProcess(pid):
            self.debugger_active    = True
            self.pid                = int(pid)
            self.run()

        else:
            print "[*] Unable to attach to the process. Error: 0x%08x." % kernel32.GetLastError()

    def run(self):
        # Now we have to poll the debuggee for debugging events

        self.count = 1;
        while self.debugger_active == True:
            self.get_debug_event()

    def get_debug_event(self):

        debug_event     = DEBUG_EVENT()
        continue_status = DBG_CONTINUE

        if kernel32.WaitForDebugEvent(byref(debug_event), INFINITE):

            # We aren't going to build any event handlers
            # just yet. Let's just resume the process for now.
            # raw_input("Press a key to continue...")
            # self.debugger_active = False
            kernel32.ContinueDebugEvent(debug_event.dwProcessId, debug_event.dwThreadId, continue_status)
            print "Just finished ContinueDebugEvent %d" % self.count
            self.count += 1

    def detach(self):

        if kernel32.DebugActiveProcessStop(self.pid):
            print "[*] Finished debugging. Exiting..."
            return True
        else:
            print "There was an error finishing debugging"
            return False

    def open_thread(self, thread_id):

        print "open_thread"
        h_thread = kernel32.OpenThread(THREAD_ALL_ACCESS, None, thread_id)

        if h_thread is not None:
            return h_thread

        else:
            print "[*] Could not obtain a valid thread handle."
            return False

    def enumerate_threads(self):

        print "enumerate_threads"
        thread_entry    = THREADENTRY32()
        thread_list     = []
        snapshot        = kernel32.CreateToolhelp32Snapshot(TH32CS_SNAPTHREAD, self.pid)

        if snapshot is not None:
            # You have to set the size of the struct
            # or the call will fail
            thread_entry.dwSize = sizeof(thread_entry)
            success             = kernel32.Thread32First(snapshot, byref(thread_entry))

            while success:
                if thread_entry.th32OwnerProcessID == self.pid:
                    thread_list.append(thread_entry.th32ThreadID)
                success = kernel32.Thread32Next(snapshot, byref(thread_entry))

            kernel32.CloseHandle(snapshot)
            return thread_list

        else:
            return False

    def get_thread_context(self, thread_id):

        print "get_thread_context"
        context                 = CONTEXT()
        context.ContextFlags    = CONTEXT_FULL | CONTEXT_DEBUG_REGISTERS

        # Obtain a handle to the thread
        h_thread = self.open_thread(thread_id)

        if kernel32.GetThreadContext(h_thread, byref(context)):
            kernel32.CloseHandle(h_thread)
            return context

        else:
            return False 

ADDED

I debugged this a little bit, and found out that when get_thread_context is called, it always returns false.

Also, at the end of the ContinueDebugEvent, it does not call EXIT_THREAD_DEBUG_EVENT. It just terminates the program right after calling EXEPTION_DEBUG_EVENT.

I'm not sure if these two are related, but just as an update.

Thank you very much.

PART SOLUTION

I found one huge error in the code.

I don't know if the book has some kind of edited version or not.

Anyway, one of my problems was that get_thread_context didn't work.

The source should change to

def get_thread_context(self, h_thread):

    context                 = CONTEXT()
    context.ContextFlags    = CONTEXT_FULL | CONTEXT_DEBUG_REGISTERS

    if kernel32.GetThreadContext(h_thread, byref(context)):
        kernel32.CloseHandle(h_thread)
        return context

    else:
        return False 

For some reason, the source in the book gave the thread handle as the parameter of open_thread. You already had got the thread handle before and gave that as the parameter of get_thread_context. So no need for that again.

=============== Still haven't found any solution for the other error. Which the ContinueDebugEvent won't finish with EXIT_THREAD_DEBUG_EVENT.

share|improve this question
    
I'm having a problem with the same code, but in my case the code compiles fine, the problem is: the content of registers printed by the code is always : 0x00000000 It seems like the codes works only on a 32-bit platforms –  a.u.r Jun 21 '13 at 23:04
    
How would you go about changing 32bit code to run on x64? Do we need to update the win32API function calls and ctypes only? Or is it the Python code which causes these the incompatibility with x64? I am interested in redoing all the code for this book as x64 code as a side project to improve python skill. @a.u.r –  user1800340 Aug 4 '13 at 4:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's confirmed that the code for this book only works on a 32 bit platform. Also, there are a few bugs in the source which are noted on the books website which will stop the programs from working. If you download the source from the site, these bugs have been removed.

If you want to get the code to run on your machine and you run x64, you can download "Windows XP mode" which is a virtual 32 bit windows XP environment made available for free by microsoft. http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=3702. Install your Python IDE there and the code should run.

share|improve this answer
    
32bit? thanks for the heads up. I am running a 64 and having some issues. –  Vnge Aug 20 at 2:14

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