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I was wondering if it's possible to do mathematical operation between lists of numerical variables? For example, I have..

pointA = [ 22, 44, 83 ]
pointB = [ -17, 11, -25 ]

pointC = pointA - pointB
#result: [ 5, 55, 61 ]

Or should I just create my own function? Thank you!

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2  
You should look at the numpy library. –  BrenBarn May 9 '13 at 4:00
    
Your example result is for pointA + pointB. –  Beni Cherniavsky-Paskin May 9 '13 at 4:42

5 Answers 5

You're adding, not subtracting, to get that result ... anyway, list comprehensions and zip() will give you what you want:

>>> pointA = [22, 44, 83]
>>> pointB = [-17, 11, -25]
>>> pointC = [a + b for a, b in zip(pointA, pointB)]
>>> pointC
[5, 55, 58]
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1  
Or just [sum(x) for x in zip (pointA, pointB)]. –  squiguy May 9 '13 at 4:21
    
@squiguy in this particular case where we know we only have two integers to add, sum() is just adding an unnecessary function call (and is marginally less readable IMO). –  Zero Piraeus May 9 '13 at 4:26
    
Sure, but then if you have more than two lists you can use the * in zip and expand it for any number. It's really no big difference. +1 –  squiguy May 9 '13 at 4:28

This can be done with map:

pointC = map(lambda p1, p2: p1 + p2, pointA, pointB)

or, more simply:

from operators import add
pointC = map(add, pointA, pointB)
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1  
This is nice and clear and highlights that map() doesn't need zip(), which we see all the time! (If additional iterable arguments are passed, function must take that many arguments and is applied to the items from all iterables in parallel.) –  Johnsyweb May 9 '13 at 4:13
    
If more than two points must be added, zip() the points and map() over them using sum() (i.e. map(sum, zip(pointA, pointB, pointC, ...))), or make a new vararg adder function: add_all = lambda *a: sum(a) –  Tim Heap May 9 '13 at 4:22

Install numpy.

>>> import numpy
>>> numpy.add([ 22, 44, 83 ], [ -17, 11, -25 ])
array([ 5, 55, 58])

array objects are mostly list-compatible, but are much more powerful.

>>> pointA = numpy.array([ 22, 44, 83 ])
>>> pointB = numpy.array([ -17, 11, -25 ])
>>> pointA + pointB
array([ 5, 55, 58])
>>> pointA * pointB
array([ -374,   484, -2075])
>>> pointA.dot(pointB)
-1965

Supports tons of other operations, matrices and multi-dimentional arrays...

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+1 (always) for numpy. –  Burhan Khalid May 9 '13 at 9:28

Something like this perhaps:

In [1]: def calculate(p1, p2):
   ...:     return map(sum, zip(p1, p2))

In [2]: pointA = [ 22, 44, 83 ]
   ...: pointB = [ -17, 11, -25 ]

In [3]: calculate(pointA, pointB)
Out[3]: [5, 55, 58]
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The operator module contains a function for every python operator. map() has a multi-argument form so you don't need zip(): map(operator.add, [ 22, 44, 83 ], [ -17, 11, -25 ]) == [5, 55, 58] –  Beni Cherniavsky-Paskin May 9 '13 at 4:26
    
@BeniCherniavsky-Paskin - Of course it has. However, I think in this case this is still a viable alternative. –  root May 9 '13 at 4:34

I've been working on a linear algebra module in Python that could be used for this. It is lightweight and easy to use. The add() method allows you to add a list of matrices, in the event that you want to add more than two points.

Check it out here: https://github.com/makemachine/m-by-n

A = [
            [8, 3, 4],
            [21, 3, 7],
            [3, 5, 2]
    ]

B = [
            [5, 3, 1], 
            [1, 9, 4],
            [3, 6, 1]
    ]

mbyn.add([A, B])

#output
#13, 6, 5
#22, 12, 11
#6, 11, 3
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1  
No offense, but what advantage does this offer the OP over a robust, tested and debugged library like numpy? If there is one, you should update your question to reflect this. –  Hooked May 9 '13 at 4:47
    
None taken. I would not suggest that someone replace numpy with the module I'm working on. Anyone who visits my github repo will see that the readme clearly states that it is a project that I'm working on as a means to learning linear algebra. That said, numpy could be considered to be a bit overkill for the simple problem this question seeks to solve. Because of this, I see utility in the simple add method used in the example above. –  jeremynealbrown May 9 '13 at 5:07
    
Protip #5468 - Don't reinvent the wheel. –  Burhan Khalid May 9 '13 at 9:29
    
@BurhanKhalid Thanks for the "Protip". As mentioned above and as noted in the linked repo: My aim is to learn linear algebra and I'm doing that through implementing simple algebraic algorithms in Python. I'm not setting out to re-invent the wheel. Did you even read my answer or following comment? –  jeremynealbrown May 9 '13 at 15:06

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