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I have a class "Blackbox" which represents a box that communicates with various machines around the lab I am in. This class is written by someone else and so I can't see how its internals work.

The way I usually use the Blackbox class is by constructing a Blackbox object, connecting to the physical box and then adding a listener method as follows:

Blackbox b = new Blackbox("192.168.0.2");
b.messageReceived += myFunction;

Then in the same class, I usually have something like

private void myFunction(string s)
{
    // do something with s
}

This typically works fine, whenever the blackbox gets a message from a machine, it calls myFunction with a string that I can process.

Now the problem occurs when I try passing the blackbox to another form, example code as follows (I'm writing the code out in a way to try minimise (what I think are) the irrelevant details. Hopefully I have now finally succeeded in doing that.):

static class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        Application.EnableVisualStyles();
        Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
        Application.Run(new Blah());
    }
}

class Blah : Form {

    public Blah()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        Blackbox b = new Blackbox("192.168.0.2");
        MyDialog md = new MyDialog(b);
        md.ShowDialog();
    }
}

class MyDialog : Form
{
    private Blackbox b;

    public MyDialog(BlackBox b) : this()
    {
        this.b = b;
        b.messageReceived += myNewFunction;
    }

    private void myNewFunction(string s)
    {
        // this function never ends up being called
    }
}

Here the Dialog is created and almost everything works besides the event listeners. I can use other Blackbox functions such as b.sendMessage() to send machines messages fine inside MyDialog. Does anyone know why this is happening?

Moreover, if I do something like: b.messageReceived("test") inside MyDialog, myNewFunction("test") ends up being called. It's as if there are two Blackbox objects created somehow. Could this be due to the implementation of Blackbox or is there a more fundamental C# reason for why this is?

Thanks for your time.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

You need to pass your Form to Application.Run in order for it to work.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa334771(v=vs.71).aspx

So you main should look like:

static void main(string[] args)
{
    Blackbox b = new Blackbox("192.168.0.2");
    Application.Run(new MyDialog(b));
}

This will set up a message pump needed for the events to work.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. It seems the code I omitted to present the question better has probably made me miss something important. For me, there is no main method, rather the dialog is being called from another form. When I try calling Application.Run() from within it, I get an "InvalidOperationException" saying I can't start a second message loop in a single thread. I will edit the code in my question, sorry about that. –  muzzlator May 9 '13 at 4:18

Are you keeping a reference to "b" in your dialog class?

class MyDialog : Form
{

    private BlackBox b;

    public MyDialog(BlackBox b) : this()
    {
        this.b = b;
        b.messageReceived += myNewFunction;
    }

    private void myNewFunction(string s)
    {
        // this function never ends up being called
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, yet again more details that I probably should have kept. Yep, I am keeping a reference to it. I was trying to cut down on the code so that I didn't end up with a massive question –  muzzlator May 9 '13 at 5:07
    
Unfortunately, I think we'd need to see more code to figure it out. Does it behave any differently with md.Show(); versus md.ShowDialog();? –  Idle_Mind May 9 '13 at 12:29
    
It doesn't behave any differently using md.Show() either. So it appears as though it isn't something to do with dialogs. I will put more code up when I have access to it tomorrow, unfortunately I can't access it from where I am staying at the moment. Thanks though, appreciate the help. –  muzzlator May 9 '13 at 14:49
    
I have a feeling it has something to do with the library I am using. If I try calling b.messageRxed("test") and handle that, it works fine. It's as if the physical blackbox is calling messageRxed() on a different copy of b and somehow triggering a different method. I have a feeling I am heading into high level C# nitty-gritty territory (and since I've only been using it for 2 weeks, I think I should wait until the programmer comes back and helps me out). –  muzzlator May 10 '13 at 0:50

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