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I designed a generic method, to read/write Set of Enum values as BigInteger

My original implementation

public static <T extends Enum<T>> Set<T> asList(BigInteger integer, Class<T> targetClass) {
    Set<T> enums = new HashSet<T>();
    // Step 0. Sanity check
    if (targetClass == null || integer == null || !targetClass.isEnum())
        return enums;
    // Step 1. Checking each value of target class
    T[] values = targetClass.getEnumConstants();
    for (int i = 0; i < values.length; i++) {
        if (integer.testBit(i))
            enums.add(values[i]);
    }
    // Step 3. Returning final enums
    return enums;
}

But, I switched to :

  public static <T extends Enum<T>> Set<T> asSet(BigInteger integer, Class<T> targetClass) {
    Set<T> enums = new HashSet<T>();
    // Step 0. Sanity check
    if (targetClass == null || integer == null || !targetClass.isEnum())
        return enums;
    // Step 1. Checking each value of target class
    T[] values = targetClass.getEnumConstants();
    for (int i = 0; i < values.length; i++) {
        T value = values[i];
        if (integer.testBit(value.ordinal()))
            enums.add(value);
    }
    // Step 3. Returning final enums
    return enums;
}

I've done so because of Enum.ordinal description in documentation:

 * Returns the ordinal of this enumeration constant (its position
 * in its enum declaration, where the initial constant is assigned
 * an ordinal of zero).

So basically, first value might not always be 0.

In which cases, or on which JVM's does enum initial value is not 0?

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1  
How do you get from "where the initial constant is assigned an ordinal of zero" to "first value might not always be 0"? –  Jon Skeet May 9 '13 at 5:55
    
Misread it. Now I see my error. –  mavarazy May 12 '13 at 5:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You say So basically, first value might not always be 0. how did you come to this conclusion?

The first enum constant always have a ordinal of 0. Of course if you change the order or add a new constant it will change for the same element. Which is why this is a bad idea.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I misread the documentation. I read of zero as or zero, my bad. –  mavarazy May 12 '13 at 5:48

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