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I modified my paint's method for loop that drew JPanels squares to where the everything that has to do with the newly added JPanels is not within the for loop as it used to be, but rather in it's own method called addBlock(..). After I did that, the JPanels no longer show up.

Basically what I'm trying to do with this program is being able to add and remove JPanels (which are represented by 60x60 blocks) on demand. That's why I use ArrayList... so that all I have to do is call the paint() method afterwards and it repaints based on how many elements I have in my ArrayList. This is the early stages and I'm still new, so I'm not even sure if there's a more efficient way. For now I just want things to display.

Here's my code:

import java.awt.*;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import javax.swing.*;

class TestApp extends JFrame{
    JFrame frame = new JFrame();
    ArrayList<JPanel> grid = new ArrayList<JPanel>();

    private static int amount = 10;

    private void paint()
    {   
        for(int i = 0, x = 0, y = 0; i < amount; i++, x += 62)
        {
            addBlock(i, x, y);
        }
    }

    //Adds a block
    private void addBlock(int index, int x, int y){
        int height = 60;
        int width = 60;

        grid.add(new JPanel());
        frame.add(grid.get(index));

        (grid.get(index)).setVisible(true);
        (grid.get(index)).setBounds(x, y, width, height);
    }  

    //Removes a block
    private void removeFrame(int index){
        frame.remove(grid.get(index));
        grid.remove(index);
    }  

    //Default Constructor (sets up JFrame)
    TestApp(){ 
        frame.setLayout(null);
        frame.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(600, 300));
        frame.setTitle("Test Program");
        frame.setBackground(Color.WHITE); 
        frame.pack();
        frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
        frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        frame.setAlwaysOnTop(rootPaneCheckingEnabled);
        frame.setResizable(true);
        frame.setVisible(true);
    }

    public static void main(String [] args) {
        TestApp program = new TestApp();
        program.paint();
    }
}

Any ideas or suggestions?

EDIT: Here's the fixed and improved code. I haven't implemented other things that were suggested yet, because I haven't done enough research yet.

package my;

import java.awt.*;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import javax.swing.*;
import javax.swing.border.LineBorder;

class TestApp extends JFrame{
    JFrame frame = new JFrame();
    ArrayList<JButton> grid = new ArrayList<JButton>();

    private static int amount = 46;
    private static int counter = 0;

    private void paintGrid()
    {   
        for(int i = 0, y = 4; i < ((amount / 10) + (amount % 10)); i++, y += 104)
        {
            for(int j = 0, x = 4; j < 10 && (counter < amount); j++, x += 84)
            {
                addBlock(counter, x, y);
                counter++;
            }
        }
    }

    //Adds a block
    private void addBlock(int index, int x, int y){
        int height = 100;
        int width = 80;

        grid.add(new JButton());
        (grid.get(index)).setBackground(Color.YELLOW);
        (grid.get(index)).setBorder(new LineBorder(Color.BLACK));
        (grid.get(index)).setVisible(true);
        (grid.get(index)).setBounds(x, y, width, height);

        frame.add(grid.get(index));
    }  

    //Removes a block
    private void removeBlock(int index){
        frame.remove(grid.get(index));
        grid.remove(index);
    }  

    //Default Constructor (sets up JFrame)
    TestApp(){ 
        frame.setLayout(null);
        frame.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(850, 600));
        frame.setTitle("Test Program");        
        frame.pack();
        frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
        frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        frame.setAlwaysOnTop(rootPaneCheckingEnabled);
        frame.setResizable(false);
        frame.setVisible(true);
    }

    public static void main(String [] args) {
        TestApp program = new TestApp();
        program.paintGrid();
    }
}
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The question is, how do you know the panels haven't been added? They are the same color as the parent panel?

Try changing your addBlock method to highlight each of the panels...

private void addBlock(int index, int x, int y){
    int height = 60;
    int width = 60;

    JPanel panel = new JPanel()
    panel.setBorder(new LineBorder(Color.BLACK));
    grid.add(panel);
    frame.add(grid.get(index));

    (grid.get(index)).setVisible(true);
    (grid.get(index)).setBounds(x, y, width, height);
}  

A word of advice, while null layouts look attractive, they will end up costing your more time and effort then a well thought application of one or more layout managers will...

ps - I'd also avoid using methods called paint as they will confuse other people to no end.

share|improve this answer
    
HA! You sir, are absolutely right. I completely forgot about the color when I was creating the new method. It works like a charm now. Thank you so very very very much! ;) –  B.K. May 9 '13 at 5:56
    
Nice to know something worked for a change :D –  MadProgrammer May 9 '13 at 5:56
    
heh, yeah, such a relief.. I was feeling a little bit mad there myself for a moment. :) –  B.K. May 9 '13 at 5:57
    
I just had a <face plant> moment with my senior developer, been working on problem for 6 hours which he solved in 30 seconds a 4 lines of code...can't see the trees for the forest :P –  MadProgrammer May 9 '13 at 5:58
    
Regarding your last few suggestions: Yeah, I renamed mine to paintGrid... since it makes more sense with what I'm doing. I will take a look at the layout managers... I'm very new, so I got confused the fist time I heard about them. –  B.K. May 9 '13 at 6:43

In order to do custom painting on a component, you need to make a method that looks like this:

public void paintComponent(Graphics g)

This is the only method which will be called by Swing to paint the component.

With that said, the paintComponent() method is intended for painting something on an existing UI component using the methods of the Graphics class. You shouldn't creating new components to add to the current UI.

I suggest that you create a subclass of JPanel which does the custom painting for a single element in your grid. Then add as many of these custom JPanels as you wish to a JFrame.

share|improve this answer
  1. never to add JComponents inside paint() / paintComponent() methods

  2. paint() / paintComponent() is called after all mouse & key events, internally from methods implemented in API

  3. continer don't know that any JComponent is added on runtime, have to call revalidate() & repaint()

  4. please read Oracle tutorial 2D Graphics

  5. (empty or contains Graphics) JPanel by default never return any size

share|improve this answer
    
It's actually awesome that you pointed me to that link, it had something I was wondering about and wanted to implement while working on this program, printing. They have a tutorial on that! :D Thank you, sir. –  B.K. May 9 '13 at 6:09
  1. You do not specify any LayoutManager. Swing Layout Manager gives you an overview of what suits you best and replace frame.setLayout(null); Null Layouts are not a good choice!

  2. You add empty JPanels. Even if it works you will not see anything. I modified the app and it works with FlowLayout and JLabels.

    import java.awt.*;
    import java.util.ArrayList;
    import javax.swing.*;
    
    public class TestApp extends JFrame{
        JFrame frame = new JFrame();
        ArrayList<JLabel> grid = new ArrayList<JLabel>();
    
        private static int amount = 10;
    
        private void paint()
        {   
            for(int i = 0, x = 0, y = 0; i < amount; i++, x += 62)
            {
                addBlock(i, x, y);
            }
        }
    
        //Adds a block
        private void addBlock(int index, int x, int y){
            int height = 60;
            int width = 60;
    
            grid.add(new JLabel("hello"));
            frame.add(grid.get(index));
    
            (grid.get(index)).setVisible(true);
            (grid.get(index)).setBounds(x, y, width, height);
    
            frame.revalidate();
            frame.repaint();
        }  
    
        //Removes a block
        private void removeFrame(int index){
            frame.remove(grid.get(index));
            grid.remove(index);
        }  
    
        //Default Constructor (sets up JFrame)
        TestApp(){ 
            frame.setLayout(new FlowLayout());
            frame.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(600, 300));
            frame.setTitle("Test Program");
            frame.setBackground(Color.WHITE); 
            frame.pack();
            frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
            frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
            frame.setAlwaysOnTop(rootPaneCheckingEnabled);
            frame.setResizable(true);
            frame.setVisible(true);
        }
    
        public static void main(String [] args) {
            TestApp program = new TestApp();
            program.paint();
    }
    }
    
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, I will definitely research more on the Layout Managers. –  B.K. May 9 '13 at 7:26

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