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The application takes a lot of database queries. Request is created after the event made by the user or through the use of several timer (10 sec tick).

The problem occurs when the database server suddenly becomes unavailable. This causes a huge amount of on-screen messages containing information about the error in the connection.

I would like to achieve a situation in which a failed open call will freeze the application and open a single window that indicates a problem where the connection attempt will be retried every X seconds (plus a progress bar). If the connection is restored window is closed and the application will unlock.

How to do it? Please assumptions / guidelines or examples of ready-made solutions.

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When you say, 'huge amount of on-screen message' do you mean that you have a huge amount of users or do you mean that your WinForms app has code in it to show lots and lots of error messages to the user? –  Chris F Carroll May 9 '13 at 8:16
    
I assume that there's the normal sql connection timeout (30 seconds?) before you get the error messages on screen? –  Chris F Carroll May 9 '13 at 8:18
    
The first thing that comes to mind is to open a modal dialog without buttons to close and start your retry work. However I would provide a method to dismiss everything and close the application ( a counter of the retry that when reaches a certain threshold allows the user to give up) –  Steve May 9 '13 at 8:21
    
@Steve. Of course, I will add button "Quit the application" to this modal form. –  Dominik May 9 '13 at 8:31
    
@Chris F Carroll, That's right, the problem is that the window of the lack of connection should occur immediately (ie after 2 seconds, it's LAN). Even if I set Connect Timeout = 2 it will throw an Exception after 30 sec. " "huge amount of on-screen message" = "lots and lots of error messages to the user". –  Dominik May 9 '13 at 8:36

1 Answer 1

So if I understand you right, it's a usability problem. Your goal is for your users to be happy & confident that all is well, whilst waiting for a db connection. You don't want: panicky users pressing random buttons, phoning for help and complaining. You don't want a load of meaningless technical error messages; nor a frozen app with no messages. But you will accept a temporarily frozen app with a good helpful message.

Good usability doesn't come cheap. If you want to allow the user to cancel, then you have to learn some multi-threading. For that, I'd start here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms951089.aspx. You can avoid this if you are satisfied with a static message saying 'please wait, database connection may take up to xxx seconds...'.

I take a wild guess that your WinForms app calls the database from lots of places, but you'd like something that doesn't take days of re-writing.

The simplest single-threaded solution I can think of is to define a PleaseWaitForm and a 'wrapper' method, which I'll call DoWithPleaseWait(), which will go round all your business logic/data access calls, showing and hiding the please wait form:

namespace WinFormsPleaseWaitExample
{
//You don't need these 2 lines if you have .Net 3 or later
public delegate void Action(); 
public delegate TResult Func<TResult>();
//

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    private readonly Form pleaseWaitForm;
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        pleaseWaitForm = new PleaseWaitForm {Owner = this};
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        var result= DoWithPleaseWait(delegate { return SomeBusinessLayerClass.ADataRetrieval("boo"); });
        MessageBox.Show(result.ToString());
    }

    private void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        DoWithPleaseWait(delegate { SomeBusinessLayerClass.ADataOperation("boo"); });
    }

    public void DoWithPleaseWait(Action action)
    {
        pleaseWaitForm.Show();
        action.DynamicInvoke();
        pleaseWaitForm.Hide();
    }

    public TResult DoWithPleaseWait<TResult>(Func<TResult> func)
    {
        pleaseWaitForm.Show();
        TResult result = (TResult)func.DynamicInvoke();
        pleaseWaitForm.Hide();
        return result;
    }
}

public class SomeBusinessLayerClass
{
    public static void ADataOperation(string someInput)
    {
        //Do something that might take several seconds...
        Thread.Sleep(3000);
    }
    public static object ADataRetrieval(string someInput)
    {
        //Do something that might take several seconds...
        Thread.Sleep(3000);
        return someInput + " returned";
    }
}
}
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