Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have written this very simple code in fortran:

program su
  implicit none
  real ran3
  write(*,*) ran3(0)
end program su

real*8 function ran3(iseed)
  implicit none
  integer iseed
  iseed=iseed*153941+1
  ran3=float(iseed)*2.328+0.5     
end function ran3

I have no problem in compiling it but when I execute the code I get:it I get this massage:

Program received signal SIGSEGV: Segmentation fault - invalid memory reference.

Backtrace for this error:
#0  0xB76BAC8B
#1  0xB76BB2DC
#2  0xB77BA3FF
#3  0x8048653 in ran3_
#4  0x80486B3 in MAIN__ at der.f90:?
Segmentation fault (core dumped)

Could you please tell why? and how I can solve it Thanks a lot

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

I see two problems with the code. The first is the one which I think is the cause of the error. The function ran3 is referenced with the constant 0 as the actual argument, but the corresponding dummy argument iseed is used on the left side of an assignment statement in the function. This is an error: you can't change the value of zero.

The second error is that ran3 returns a real*8 (whatever that may be; it's a non-standard declaration), but in the main program ran3 is declared as being a default real.

The following program and function compile with gfortran 4.7.2.

program su
    implicit none
    real :: ran3

    write(*, *) ran3(0)
end program su

function ran3(iseed)
    implicit none
    integer :: iseed, temp
    real :: ran3

    temp = iseed * 153941 + 1
    ran3 = temp * 2.328 + 0.5
end function ran3
share|improve this answer
    
I deeply appreciate your help thank you –  amin bk May 9 '13 at 14:51

Your code has done nothing to tell the compiler that the declaration

real ran3

refers to the function you define later in your source file. To the compiler you have declared a real variable called ran3. Once the compiler has read the end statement at the end of the program it can bugger off and drink mojitos if it wants to, it is not bound to do any more compilation -- though you might find that some compilers do.

A general rule in structuring Fortran programs is that the compiler must encounter the definition of an entity (variable, function, subroutine, derived-type, what-have-you) before it encounters any use thereof. Your code has broken this rule.

Once the code has declared a real variable it tries, in this statement,

write(*,*) ran3(0)

to access the 0-th element of an array called ran3 and it all ends in tears.

The quick fix would be to move end program su to the end of the source file, and to put a line containing the keyword contains before the definition of the function. You could then delete the declaration real ran3 as the compiler will take care of any linking that needs to be done.

Oh, and while I'm writing, you could do yourself, and those trying to comprehend your code, a favour by paying more attention to formatting what you have posted. Personally (opinion coming up, look away now if you are easily upset) I would fire any programmer who turned in code looking like that on the grounds that anyone who pays so little attention to the small stuff probably doesn't pay much attention to the big stuff either.

share|improve this answer
    
As I understand it, it is not necessary to tell the compiler that the declaration of ran3 refers to a function. It has no dimension attribute, so the processor knows it is not an array. From the form of the reference ran3(0) the processor can deduce that it is a function call. –  eriktous May 9 '13 at 11:21
    
I really appreciate your help thank you –  amin bk May 9 '13 at 15:03

If you want, for whatever reason, that your iseed is modified by the function, you should mark it with intent(in out). If you do so, the compiler will trigger an error at compile time when you call the function using a literal constant. If you want to use the parameter just as input, you can mark it as intent(in), and you will get again an error since you are assigning iseed inside your function.

I think it can be a good idea to get the habit of declaring the intent.

Your code could look like

program su
    implicit none

    write(*, *) ran3(0)

contains

  function ran3(iseed)
    implicit none
    real :: ran3
    integer, intent(in) :: iseed
    ! or intent(in out) :: iseed

    iseed = iseed*153941+1
    ran3 = float(iseed)*2.328+0.5     
  end function ran3

end program su

(this won't compile no matter if you use "in" or "in out" as intent, because of what explaned early).

The following instead will compile (and should work, too)

program su
    implicit none

    write(*, *) ran3(0)

contains

  function ran3(iseed)
    implicit none
    real :: ran3
    integer, intent(in) :: iseed

    ran3 = real(iseed*153941+1)*2.328+0.5     
  end function ran3

end program su
share|improve this answer
    
(since the "why" is given elsewhere, I've not taken it into consideration) –  ShinTakezou May 10 '13 at 9:02
    
Thank you so much –  amin bk May 19 '13 at 13:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.