Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Every positive integer divide some number whose representation (base 10) contains only zeroes and ones.

One can prove that:

Consider the numbers 1, 11, 111, 1111, etc. up to 111... 1, where the last number has n+1 digits. Call these numbers m1, m2, ... , mn+1. Each has a remainder when divided by n, and two of these remainders must be the same. Because there are n+1 of them but only n values a remainder can take. This is an application of the famous and useful “pigeonhole principle”;

Suppose the two numbers with the same remainder are mi and mj , with i < j. Now subtract the smaller from the larger. The resulting number, mi−mj, consisting of j - i ones followed by i zeroes, must be a multiple of n.

But how to find the smallest answer? and effciently?

share|improve this question
    
This question is getting down-voted and close-voted because it's really unclear what you're asking for. Can you edit it to clarify what the algorithm is supposed to do? –  Vicky May 9 '13 at 9:06
    
@Vicky refined. –  Sayakiss May 9 '13 at 9:38
    
Thanks for the clarification. I've now voted to reopen. –  Vicky May 9 '13 at 10:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The question equals to using 10i mod n (for each i, it can be used at most once) to get a sum m of n. It's like a knapsack problem or subset sum problem. In this way, dynamic programming will do the task.

In dynamic programming the complexity is O(k*n). k is the number of digits in answer. For n<105, this code works perfectly.

Code:

#include <stdio.h>
#define NUM 2000

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    signed long pow[NUM],val[NUM],x,num,ten;
    int i,j,count;
    for(num=2; num<NUM; num++)
    {
        for(i=0; i<NUM; pow[i++]=0);
        count=0;
        for(ten=1,x=1; x<NUM; x++)
        {
            val[x]=ten;

            for(j=0; j<NUM; j++)if(pow[j]&&!pow[(j+ten)%num]&&pow[j]!=x)pow[(j+ten)%num]=x;
            if(!pow[ten])pow[ten]=x;
            ten=(10*ten)%num;
            if(pow[0])break;
        }

        x=num;
        printf("%ld\tdivides\t",x=num);
        if(pow[0])
        {
            while(x)
            {
                while(--count>pow[x%num]-1)printf("0");
                count=pow[x%num]-1;
                printf("1");
                x=(num+x-val[pow[x%num]])%num;
            }
            while(count-->0)printf("0");
        }
        printf("\n");
    }
}

PS: This sequence in OEIS.

share|improve this answer
    
the time complexity of the code is O(n*n + k), memory O(n). Here's a translation to Python. –  J.F. Sebastian May 12 '13 at 3:27
    
not really. Because if(pow[0])break; –  Sayakiss May 12 '13 at 3:52
    
you're right. I was confused by n=2,3,9 cases, where n == k. –  J.F. Sebastian May 12 '13 at 7:06

Nice question. I use BFS to solve this question with meet-in-the-middle and some other prunings. Now my code can solve n<109 in a reasonable time.

#include <cstdio>
#include <cstring>

class BIT {
private: int x[40000000];
public:
    void clear() {memset(x, 0, sizeof(x));}
    void setz(int p, int z) {x[p>>5]=z?(x[p>>5]|(1<<(p&31))):(x[p>>5]&~(1<<(p&31)));}
    int bit(int p) {return x[p>>5]>>(p&31)&1;}
} bp, bq;

class UNIT {
private: int x[3];
public: int len, sum;
    void setz(int z) {x[len>>5]=z?(x[len>>5]|(1<<(len&31))):(x[len>>5]&~(1<<(len&31)));}
    int bit(int p) {return x[p>>5]>>(p&31)&1;}
} u;

class MYQUEUE {
private: UNIT x[5000000]; int h, t;
public:
    void clear() {h = t = 0;}
    bool empty() {return h == t;}
    UNIT front() {return x[h];}
    void pop() {h = (h + 1) % 5000000;}
    void push(UNIT tp) {x[t] = tp; t = (t + 1) % 5000000;}
} p, q;

int n, md[100];

void bfs()
{
    for (int i = 0, tp = 1; i < 200; i++) tp = 10LL * (md[i] = tp) % n;

    u.len = -1; u.sum = 0; q.clear(); q.push(u); bq.clear();
    while (1)
    {
        u = q.front(); if (u.len >= 40) break; q.pop();
        u.len++; u.setz(0); q.push(u);
        u.setz(1); u.sum = (u.sum + md[u.len]) % n;
        if (!bq.bit(u.sum)) {bq.setz(u.sum, 1); q.push(u);}
        if (!u.sum) {
            for (int k = u.len; k >= 0; k--) printf("%d", u.bit(k));
            puts(""); return;
        }
    }

    u.len = 40; u.sum = 0; p.clear(); p.push(u); bp.clear();
    while (1)
    {
        u = p.front(); p.pop();
        u.len++; u.setz(0); p.push(u);
        u.setz(1); u.sum = (u.sum + md[u.len]) % n;
        if (!bp.bit(u.sum)) {bp.setz(u.sum, 1); p.push(u);}
        int bf = (n - u.sum) % n;
        if (bq.bit(bf)) {
            for (int k = u.len; k > 40; k--) printf("%d", u.bit(k));
            while (!q.empty())
            {
                u = q.front(); if (u.sum == bf) break; q.pop();
            }
            for (int k = 40; k >= 0; k--) printf("%d", u.bit(k));
            puts(""); return;
        }
    }
}

int main(void)
{
    // 0 < n < 10^9
    while (~scanf("%d", &n)) bfs();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

I think this is a fair and interesting question.

Please note that though what you describe is a prove there always exist such number, the found number will not always be minimal.

Only solution I can think of is to compute the remainders of the powers of 10 modulus the given n and than try to construct a sum giving remainder 0 modulo n using at most one of each of these powers. You will never need more than n different powers(which you prove i your question).

share|improve this answer
    
But it's O(2^n)... –  Sayakiss May 9 '13 at 12:42
    
Yes. It is just the best I could come up with. –  Ivaylo Strandjev May 9 '13 at 13:10

This is a fast way to get the first 792 answers. Def the most simple code:

__author__ = 'robert'

from itertools import product

def get_nums(max_length):
    assert max_length < 21 #Otherwise there will be over 2 million possibilities
    for length in range(1, max_length + 1):
        for prod in product("10", repeat=length):
            if prod[0] == '1':
                yield int("".join(prod))

print list(get_nums(4))
[1, 11, 10, 111, 110, 101, 100, 1111, 1110, 1101, 1100, 1011, 1010, 1001, 1000]

nums = sorted(get_nums(20))
print len(nums)

solution = {}

operations = 0

for factor in range(1, 1000):
    for num in nums:
        operations += 1
        if num % factor == 0:
            solution[factor] = num
            break
    print factor, operations
    if factor not in solution:
        print "no solution for factor %s" % factor
        break

print solution[787]

max_v = max(solution.values())
for factor, val in solution.items():
    if val == max_v:
        print factor, max_v


[1, 11, 10, 111, 110, 101, 100, 1111, 1110, 1101, 1100, 1011, 1010, 1001, 1000]
1048575
1 1
2 3
3 10
4 14
5 16
6 30
7 39
8 47
9 558
10 560
11 563
12 591
13 600
14 618
15 632
16 648
17 677
18 1699
19 1724
20 1728
..
..
187 319781
188 319857
..
..
791 4899691
792 5948266
no solution for factor 792
10110001111
396 11111111111111111100
share|improve this answer
    
Your output is so strange...Why no solution for factor 792? I proved there must a solution exists for every positive integer. –  Sayakiss May 22 '13 at 1:47
    
It's because get_nums only returns a subset of all possible numbers with 1's and 0's. So it only finds a solution if the solution is in that subset. –  robert king May 22 '13 at 1:49
    
also note on average it uses 7382 operations per solution which could be improved on by factoring each possibility. –  robert king May 22 '13 at 1:52
    
Nice idea, I may take your idea to improve my code. –  Sayakiss May 22 '13 at 1:56
    
yup - just factor the numbers in order (thats why I sorted them). The solution will be much better if get_nums can generate the numbers in order (which is easily possible). Also when factoring, each time you find a new factor, check if that factor has a previous solution, if not, save the answer against it. Note because the numbers only have 1's and 0's, you may be able to factor faster and use dynamic programming to remember parts of the number that have already been factored. –  robert king May 22 '13 at 1:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.