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I am designing a database and my tables are as follows

  • A company can have many departments,and a department belong to one company
  • A company can have many Employees, and a employee belong to one company
  • A department can have many employees and a employee belong to one department
Company(
      ID,
      Name,
) 

Department(
      ID,
      Title,
      CompanyID (FK_Department_Company)
      UNIQUE(Title,CompanyID)
)

Employee(
      ID,
      Fname,
      LName,
      CompanyID, (FK_Employee_Company)
      DepartmentID (FK_Employee_Department)
)

So i found that there is possibility to insert wrong data into the Employee table

here are the sample values

company  (
       25,Spar Pvt LTD, Sweden, 12345678.
       26,Mr.Wheel Pvt Ltd, Germany, 123456789)

Department(
       101, Manager,25
       102, Front Desk,25
       103, Host,26)

Employee( 81,25,103,....) 

Here DepartmentID 103 belongs to CompanyID 26, but still I can insert, So is there anyway to solve this problem (sqlserver), or i have to change the design, please give me some suggestions and ideas.

Regards,

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1  
You dont need a company ID column on employees table. Departments table has relation to Companies table and employees is related to Departments, you can insert correct data that way and fetch any data you want. –  Fr0zenFyr May 9 '13 at 9:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You don't need CompanyID in the Employee table

From 2 of your statements above

  • A company can have many departments,and a department belong to one company
  • A department can have many employees and a employee belong to one department

This implies

  • A company can have many Employees, and a employee belong to one company

Therefore, the Employee-Company relationship is implied by the intermediate Department table. A separate foreign key/column is not needed

tl;dr: Identified by this assertion: "...a employee belong to one company".

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1  
Kudos. Another way of saying it is that the companyid in the employee table repeats a fact already stored in the comdination of the FK from employee to department, and the FK from department to company. When the same fact is stated more than once in the database, the database can contradict itself. The problem can be obviated by adhering to the normalization principles. –  Walter Mitty May 9 '13 at 11:50

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