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Before i must say this : Please, excuse me for my bad english... I'm student.My teacher gave me problem in pascal for my course work... I must write program that calculates 2^n for big values of n...I've wrote but there is a problem...My program returns 0 for values of n that bigger than 30...My code is below...Please help me:::Thanks beforehand...

function control(a: integer): boolean;
var 
   b: boolean;
begin
   if (a >= 10) then b := true
   else b := false;

   control := b;
end;

const
   n = 200000000;

var
   a: array[1..n] of integer;
   i, j, c, t, rsayi: longint; k: string;

begin
   writeln('2^n');
   write('n=');
   read(k);

   a[1] := 1;
   rsayi := 1;
   val(k, t, c);

   for i := 1 to t do
   for j := 1 to t div 2 do
   begin
      a[j] := a[j] * 2;
   end;

   for i := 1 to t div 2 do
   begin
      if control(a[j]) = true then
      begin
         a[j + 1] := a[j + 1] + (a[j] div 10);
         a[j] := a[j] mod 10;
         rsayi := rsayi + 1;
      end;
   end;
   for j := rsayi downto 1 do write(a[j]);
end.
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to get 2^n just a shift is enough. 2^n = 1 shl n. It's just a simplie instruction instead of many slow multiplies. If n is larger than 64 bits then you need to implement large precision or arbitrary precision shift –  Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Apr 30 '14 at 5:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The first (nested) loop boils down to "t" multiplications by 2 on every single element of a.

30 multiplications by two is as far as you can go with a 32-bit integer (2^31-1 of positive values, so 2^31 is out of reach)

So the first loop doesn't work, and you probably have to rethink your strategy.

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Thanks...But i can't think more than this for this hour :) –  Süleymanlı Heydər May 9 '13 at 10:32
    
@SüleymanlıHeydər Well with Int64 (or equivalent type) you can go up to 62 multiplications, but it's only a band-aid. You could use an arbitrary precision arithmetic library, or (if you only need powers of two) derive the decimal digits of 2^n analytically. That said 2^200000000 is a huge number with approximately 60 million decimal digits, so are you sure this is the right thing to do? But I guess it's too late anyway. –  Thomas May 9 '13 at 13:03
    
I think the purpose of the assignment is to realize this and make a MPI multiplication routine. –  Marco van de Voort May 9 '13 at 18:48

Here is a quick and dirty program to compute all 2^n up to some given, possibly large, n. The program repeatedly doubles the number in array a, which is stored in base 10; with lower digit in a[1]. Notice it's not particularly fast, so it would not be wise to use it for n = 200000000.

program powers;

const
   n = 2000;   { largest power to compute }
   m = 700;    { length of array, should be at least log(2)*n }

var
   a: array[1 .. m] of integer;
   carry, s, p, i, j: integer;

begin
   p := 1;
   a[1] := 1;
   for i := 1 to n do
   begin
      carry := 0;
      for j := 1 to p do
      begin
         s := 2*a[j] + carry;
         if s >= 10 then
         begin
            carry := 1;
            a[j] := s - 10
         end
         else
         begin
            carry := 0;
            a[j] := s
         end
      end;
      if carry > 0 then
      begin
         p := p + 1;
         a[p] := 1
      end;
      write(i, ': ');
      for j := p downto 1 do
         write(a[j]);
      writeln
   end
end.
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