Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to create a log system on my program that will log debugging messages on text files, and I want to save the exact place in the code where the log message called, but I don't want to use Assert function because it creates exceptions and this system is not for logging exceptions only, also I have to write some debugging info.

example usning assert:

procedure AnyProcedure();
begin
  try
    Assert(1=0);
  except
    on E: Exception do
      Log.AddLine('Log occurred is '+E.Message+' : Start');//Log occurred is "c:\progr~..jkdj.pas" at line [29]
  end;

  //....some code
  try
    Assert(1=0);
  except
    on E: Exception do
      Log.AddLine('Log occurred is '+E.Message+' : Step1 done');//Log occurred is "c:\progr~..jkdj.pas" at line [37]
  end;

  //....some code
  try
    Assert(1=0);
  except
    on E: Exception do
      Log.AddLine('Log occurred is '+E.Message+' : Step2 done');//Log occurred is "c:\progr~..jkdj.pas" at line [45]
  end;

  //....some code
  try
    Assert(1=0);
  except
    on E: Exception do
      Log.AddLine('Log occurred is '+E.Message+' : Step3 done');//Log occurred is  "c:\progr~..jkdj.pas" at line [53]
  end;

  //....some code
  try
    Assert(1=0);
  except
    on E: Exception do
      Log.AddLine('Log '+E.Message+' : End');//Log occurred is "c:\progr~..jkdj.pas" at line [61]
  end;
end;

this works fine the only thing that it raises an exception and the code become too big, so I can't use a function -see next example function LogMessage- and call it in another place because the line will be the same always also the file name will be where the LogMessage function implemented:

not working example:

procedure LogMessage(AMessage: String);
var AFile, ALine: String;
begin
  try
    Assert(1=0);             //line 29
  except
    on E: Exception do
    begin
      AFile:= Copy(E.Message, Pos(' (', E.Message)+2, Pos(', line ', E.Message)-Pos(' (', E.Message)-2);
      ALine:= Copy(E.Message, Pos(', line ', E.Message)+7, Pos(')', E.Message)-Pos(', line ', E.Message)-7);
      ShowMessage('Log occurred in file "'+AFile+'" at line ['+ALine+'] : '+AMessage);
    end;
  end;
end;

procedure AnyProcedure();
begin
  LogMessage('Start'); //Log occurred in file "c:\progr~....jkashdj.pas" at line [29]
//....
  LogMessage('step1'); //Log occurred in file "c:\progr~....jkashdj.pas" at line [29]
//....
  LogMessage('step2'); //Log occurred in file "c:\progr~....jkashdj.pas" at line [29]
//....
  LogMessage('step3'); //Log occurred in file "c:\progr~....jkashdj.pas" at line [29]
//....
  LogMessage('end');
end

please help, and thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
4  
By the way, 1=0 is not the simplest expression that evaluates to False. That would be, well, False. –  David Heffernan May 9 '13 at 10:59
    
Thanks for the False expression too, I wrote the code very fast without thinking of how it gonna look like -I remember that I copied it from the Delphi help-. –  ZORRO_BLANCO May 9 '13 at 13:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can bind your own TAssertErrorProc procedure to the AssertErrorProc variable. You might write something like this:

procedure OnAssert(const Message, Filename: string; LineNumber: Integer;
  ErrorAddr: Pointer);
begin
  ShowMessage(Format('Assert in file "%s" at line %d.', [Filename, LineNumber]));
end;

procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
begin
  AssertErrorProc := OnAssert;
end;
share|improve this answer
1  
I know this answer is against the asked question (I don't want to use Assert), but it resolves the reason why OP doesn't want to use it (because it creates exceptions). –  TLama May 9 '13 at 11:02
    
I think this will resolve the problem I just didn't know how to use the assertion function. thanks –  ZORRO_BLANCO May 9 '13 at 11:08
    
You're welcome! –  TLama May 9 '13 at 11:10
    
The reasons why I would not use this are: 1. I can no longer use Assert to write assertions. I like being able to call Assert for its intended use. 2. Using Assert for logging leads to code that reads counter-intuitively. For example: Assert(False, 'Program initialized'); Ask yourselves why you don't see logging frameworks implemented this way. –  David Heffernan May 9 '13 at 13:59
    
@David, to point 1; you can raise EAssertionFailed by yourself (or invoke a copy of the original AssertErrorHandler procedure) to fake the original behavior if you'd be missing it ;-) –  TLama May 9 '13 at 14:21

The easiest way to map from the instruction pointer to unit name and line number is to use one of the various debugging libraries: madExcept, EurekaLog, JclDebug etc.

These tools all rely on the detailed map file that is produced by the linker. Although these libraries are best known for producing bug reports from unexpected exceptions, they have all the functionality that you need.

share|improve this answer
    
I heard about these libraries but i really don't have time to try them but thank you for the answer. –  ZORRO_BLANCO May 9 '13 at 11:09
1  
Well, if you don't have a spare hour to do it right, then take the quick option. –  David Heffernan May 9 '13 at 11:11
    
It requires full debug info, posing reverse engineering risks. I've always missed something like freepascal.org/docs-html/prog/progsu41.html#x47-460001.1.41 in Delphi. (ways to include file and linenr in the binary without debuginfo). It has the disadvantage though that you must pass it everytime it is used, since it can't get the info by unwinding the stack –  Marco van de Voort May 9 '13 at 19:22
1  
@Marco you only need a line number map. And you don't need to include that with the exe if you decode when the log is read rather than when written. –  David Heffernan May 9 '13 at 19:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.