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I am confused about the use of boost::ref. I dont understand why any one would want to do the following -

void f(int x)
{
    cout << x<<endl;
    x++;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int aaa=2;
    f(boost::ref(aaa));
    cout << aaa<<endl;
    exit(0);
}

What is the use of passing a ref to a function. I can always pass by value instead. Also it not that the ref is actually passed. In the above the value of aaa in main remains 2 only.

Where exactly is boost ref useful?

Is it possible to use boost::ref in this scenario. I want to pass iterator refernce to std::sort function. normally the sort works on iterator copies - will boost::ref make it work for references also? (without any changes to std::sort)

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2 Answers 2

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I dont understand why any one would want to do the following

They wouldn't. That's not what boost::ref (or these days std::ref) is for. If a function takes an argument by value, then there's no way to force it to take it by reference instead.

Where exactly is boost ref useful?

It can be used to make a function template act as if it takes an argument by reference, by instantiating the template for the reference (wrapper) type, rather than the value type:

template <typename T>
void f(T x) {++x;}

f(aaa);      cout << aaa << endl; // increments a copy: prints 0
f(ref(aaa)); cout << aaa << endl; // increments "a" itself: prints 1

A common specific use is for binding arguments to functions:

void f(int & x) {++x;}

int aaa = 0;
auto byval = bind(f, aaa);      // binds a copy
auto byref = bind(f, ref(aaa)); // binds a reference

byval(); cout << aaa << endl;   // increments a copy: prints 0
byref(); cout << aaa << endl;   // increments "a" itself: prints 1

Is it possible to use boost:;ref in this scenario. I want to pass iterator refernce to std::sort function. normally the sort works on iterator copies - will boost::ref make it work for references also?

No; the reference wrapper doesn't meet the iterator requirements, so you can't use it in standard algorithms. If you could, then many algorithms would go horribly wrong if they needed to make independent copies of iterators (as many, including most sort implementations, must do).

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oki understand but can you explain how this works. template <class _T> void f(_T x) { x++; } int main(int argc, char *argv[]) { int aaa=2; f<boost::reference_wrapper<int>>(boost::ref(aaa)); cout << aaa<<endl; cin >>aaa; exit(0); } The value printed is 3. Dont understand how x i function became a refernce ? –  Rohit May 9 '13 at 12:16
    
@user2161003: By explicitly writing out the reference_wrapper part (which isn't necessary), you've answered your own question: the template is instantiated with a "reference wrapper" type (returned by ref()), and that acts like a reference to the variable it wraps. –  Mike Seymour May 9 '13 at 12:28
    
but how? and object of reference_wrapper does not have ++ operator. how is x++ working? –  Rohit May 9 '13 at 12:30
    
@user2161003: Using its conversion operator, operator T&(), to convert to a real reference when needed. So ++x becomes ++(x.operator int&()) and increments aaa. –  Mike Seymour May 9 '13 at 12:36
    
ok - i had a hunch that it is beacuse of this. But what i dont understand are the rules of calling this type case operator. If x is a refernce_wrapper the i do understand that the operator will get called if i do something like this - int& a = x. but just doing x++ is also invoking the operator. strange!!! –  Rohit May 9 '13 at 12:45
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Did you read the documentation?

It says:

The Ref library is a small library that is useful for passing references to function templates (algorithms) that would usually take copies of their arguments.

In your first example, void f(int) isn't a function template, so there is no effect: an anonymous temporary boost::reference_wrapper<int> is created and immediately converted back to an int& which is then dereferenced to pass an int to your function. Hopefully the compiler will discard all this nonsense, since it has no effect.

You say:

... I can always pass by value instead.

which is true, but they do different things. Passing by reference:

  • avoids a copy, which is probably pointless for integers but is useful for large or expensive-to-copy objects
  • allows the caller to see what the called function did with its argument. This isn't likely to be useful for std::sort, but in general allowing in-out parameters can be useful

It may allow std::sort to act on iterator references, avoiding a copy (although iterators are typically cheap-to-copy value types anyway), but I haven't tried it. If you think it'll help you with something, why not try it and see?

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