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As we know, in bash programming the way to pass arguments is$1, ..., $N. However, I found it not easy to pass an array as an argument to a function which receives more than one argument. Here is one example:

f(){
 x=($1)
 y=$2

 for i in "${x[@]}"
 do
  echo $i
 done
 ....
}

a=(“jfaldsj jflajds" "LAST")
b=NOEFLDJF

f "${a[@]}" $b
f "${a[*]}" $b

As described, function freceives two arguments: the first is assigned to x which is a array, the second to y.

f can be called in two ways. The first way use the "${a[@]}" as the first argument, and the result is:

jfaldsj 
jflajds

The second way use the "${a[*]}" as the first argument, and the result is:

jfaldsj 
jflajds 
LAST

Neither result is as I wished. So, is there anyone having any idea about how to pass array between functions correctly.

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1  
possible duplicate of Passing arrays as parameters in bash –  chepner May 9 '13 at 12:49
    
@chepner thanks for reminding. I will check it later for some ideas –  Red Lv May 9 '13 at 16:36
    

4 Answers 4

up vote 20 down vote accepted

You cannot pass an array, you can only pass its elements (i.e. the expanded array).

#! /bin/bash
function f() {
    a=("$@")
    ((last_idx=${#a[@]} - 1))
    b=${a[last_idx]}
    unset a[last_idx]

    for i in "${a[@]}" ; do
        echo "$i"
    done
    echo "b: $b"
}

x=("one two" "LAST")
b='even more'

f "${x[@]}" "$b"
echo ===============
f "${x[*]}" "$b"

The other possibility would be to pass the array by name:

#! /bin/bash
function f() {
    name=$1[@]
    b=$2
    a=("${!name}")

    for i in "${a[@]}" ; do
        echo "$i"
    done
    echo "b: $b"
}

x=("one two" "LAST")
b='even more'

f x "$b"
share|improve this answer
    
pass the array by name? can you make it more clear. I found you just make it possible –  Red Lv May 9 '13 at 12:44
    
@RedLv: Just pass the name of the array and use parameter expansion with ! to get the array. –  choroba May 9 '13 at 12:48
3  
note that the value of the "name" variable is merely the string "x[@]". The magic occurs with the ${!...} –  glenn jackman May 9 '13 at 12:53
    
@choroba great this idea is perfect when the function to be called is in the same file with the caller. unfortunately, I need to pass the array and other value as arguments to a script to be executed in the remote host by the ssh user@host cmd command. Do you have any suggestion about how to make it possible. By the way, do you have any reference about the "by name" mechanism. –  Red Lv May 9 '13 at 13:13
1  
Just a note: Passing array by name => passing by reference. Any change in the called function will change the global value. Besides, arrays local to function cannot be passed. –  anishsane May 9 '13 at 13:51

You could pass the "scalar" value first. That would simplify things:

f(){
  b=$1
  shift
  a=("$@")

  for i in "${a[@]}"
  do
    echo $i
  done
  ....
}

a=(“jfaldsj jflajds" "LAST")
b=NOEFLDJF

f "$b" "${a[@]}"

At this point, you might as well use the array-ish positional params directly

f(){
  b=$1
  shift

  for i in "$@"   # or simply "for i; do"
  do
    echo $i
  done
  ....
}

f "$b" "${a[@]}"
share|improve this answer
    
You idea can work out in this case. However it doesn't hit the point of passing array as arguments. –  Red Lv May 9 '13 at 16:38

This will solve the issue of passing array to function:

#!/bin/bash
foo()
{
string=$1
array=($@)
echo "array is ${array[@]}"
echo "array is ${array[1]}"
return
}
array=(one two three)
foo ${array[@]}
colors=(red green blue)
foo ${colors[@]}
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You can pass an array by reference to a function in bash 4.3+. This comes probably from ksh, but with a different syntax. The key idea is to set the -n attribute:

show_value () # array index
{
    local -n array=$1
    local idx=$2
    echo "${array[idx]}"
}

This works for indexed arrays:

$ shadock=(ga bu zo meu)
$ show_value shadock 2
zo

It also works for associative arrays:

$ days=([monday]=eggs [tuesday]=bread [sunday]=jam)
$ show_value days sunday
jam

See also declare -n in the man page.

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