Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Just curious, if I have this table:

CREATE TABLE "post" (
    "id" SERIAL,
    "revision" INTEGER NOT NULL DEFAULT 0,
    "summary" CHARACTER VARYING NOT NULL,
    "description" TEXT NOT NULL,
    "user_id" INTEGER NOT NULL
        REFERENCES "user" ("id") MATCH FULL
            ON UPDATE CASCADE
            ON DELETE RESTRICT,
    "post_type_id" INTEGER NOT NULL
        REFERENCES "post_type" ("id") MATCH FULL
            ON UPDATE CASCADE
            ON DELETE RESTRICT,
    "ctime" TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE DEFAULT NOW(),
    PRIMARY KEY("id", "revision")
);

to store posts, and this table:

CREATE TABLE "post_state" (
    "post_id" INTEGER NOT NULL,
    "assembly_seat_id" INTEGER NOT NULL
        REFERENCES "assembly_seat" ("id") MATCH FULL
            ON UPDATE CASCADE
            ON DELETE RESTRICT,
    PRIMARY KEY("post_id")
);

and I want my post_id field to point to post(id), how do I do it? I have tried with the following phrase:

    "post_id" INTEGER NOT NULL UNIQUE,
        REFERENCES "post" ("id") MATCH SIMPLE
            ON UPDATE RESTRICT
            ON DELETE RESTRICT,

but I am getting this error:

ERROR: there is no unique constraint matching given keys for referenced table "post"

The values of post_state(asembly_seat_id) do not change in this case.

share|improve this question
1  
You can only create a foreign key that references a single row in the other table. Since post_id is not unique (only the post_id/revision combination is unique), you can't reference it. –  Joachim Isaksson May 9 '13 at 12:49
    
OH, thanks for the reply, silly me facepalm –  Jeffrey04 May 9 '13 at 12:51
    
@JoachimIsaksson: You may be interested in my answer that contradicts your comment in parts. –  Erwin Brandstetter May 10 '13 at 0:55
    
@ErwinBrandstetter yea, re-modeled the tables already :) still thanks for the answer tho –  Jeffrey04 May 10 '13 at 1:09
1  
@ErwinBrandstetter I didn't say anything about single columns in the foreign key, just that it needs to reference a single row (which is exactly what you changed it to do :) ). There are (as far as I know) basically two ways of making it reference a unique row, either make it reference the composite primary key or add a unique index to the column (post.id) he was trying to reference. Adding unique breaks the primary key in post and the foreign key change breaks what I was reading that he was attempting to do, hang a post_state on a post, not a specific revision of a post. –  Joachim Isaksson May 10 '13 at 5:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A foreign key constraint can span multiple columns. You could just add the column revision to the table post_state.

CREATE TEMP TABLE post (
  post_id serial NOT NULL
 ,revision integer NOT NULL DEFAULT 0
 ,summary text NOT NULL
 ,description text NOT NULL
 ,user_id integer NOT NULL
    REFERENCES user (id) MATCH FULL ON UPDATE CASCADE ON DELETE RESTRICT
 ,post_type_id integer NOT NULL
    REFERENCES post_type (id) MATCH FULL ON UPDATE CASCADE ON DELETE RESTRICT
 ,ctime timestamptz DEFAULT NOW()
 ,PRIMARY KEY(post_id, revision)
);

CREATE TEMP TABLE post_state (
  post_id integer NOT NULL
 ,revision integer NOT NULL
 ,assembly_seat_id integer NOT NULL
    REFERENCES assembly_seat (id) MATCH FULL ON UPDATE CASCADE ON DELETE RESTRICT
 ,PRIMARY KEY(post_id, revision)
 ,FOREIGN KEY (post_id, revision) REFERENCES post (post_id, revision)
);

Read the manual about foreign key constraints.

I am using the name post_id for the primary key column of table post. Don't use id as column name. If you join a bunch of tables you end up with a bunch of columns all names id. Regrettably, some half-wit ORMs are in the habit of doing that.

Alternatively, it might be better design to have unique post_id in table post and add a table post_revision with a n:1 relation to post.

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent answer. SQL is easy: once you master the syntax, everything reduces to a data modelling problem –  wildplasser May 9 '13 at 23:15
    
@Erwin yea, I actually re-designed the model and have another post_revision table as you mentioned :P –  Jeffrey04 May 10 '13 at 1:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.