Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Here is the job_form table...

job_num  | name | address |
---------+------+---------+
 1       | Tom  | Smith   |
 2       | John | Doe     |
 3       | Max  | Smith   |

Here is the individual_job table...

job_num  | date       | description   |
---------+------+---------------------+
 1       | 23-01-2012 | Eat food      |
 1       | 24-01-2012 | Do dishes     |
 1       | 25-01-2012 | Sweep floor   |
 ...     | ...        | ...           |
 2       | 19-05-2013 | Play games    |
 2       | 23-05-2013 | Do code       |
 2       | 27-05-2013 | Sleep         |
 ...     | ...        | ...           |
 3       | 23-05-2013 | Eat food      |
 3       | 24-05-2013 | Do dishes     |
 3       | 25-05-2013 | Sweep floor   |
 ...     | ...        | ...           |

I would like to create a query that pulls out a single row for each job_form which includes the date of the first job to be completed, the date of the last job to be completed as well as the total number of jobs listed on the form. The query needs to display only job forms which have jobs which need to be completed in the future.

Example is:

job_num  |  first_job_date  |  last_job_date  |  count_of_jobs  |  name
---------+------------------+-----------------+-----------------+-------------
2        |  19-05-2013      |  27-05-2013     |  3              |  John
3        |  23-05-2013      |  25-05-2013     |  3              |  Max

I haven't done SQL for a few years, and this one has me completely stumped. I know I have to do a nested query, but can't work out the order...

Any help much appreciated.

Updated to include name column in result (forgot about this, sorry)

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Edit As per Gordon, there is no need for a join if you don't require any of the job_form specific fields. However, if you do (e.g. name or address), then:

SELECT jf.job_id,
       jf.name, 
       MIN(ij.date) AS first_job_date, 
       MAX(ij.date) as last_job_date, 
       COUNT(*) as count_of_jobs
FROM job_form jf
  INNER JOIN individual_job ij
    ON jf.job_num = ij.job_num
GROUP BY jf.job_id, jf.name -- i.e. non-aggregated select fields here
share|improve this answer

This is a simple aggregation query:

select ij.job_num,
       min(ij.date) as first_job_date,
       max(ij.date) as last_job_date, count(*) as count_of_jobs
from individual_job ij
group by ij.job_num

For future jobs, you need a date comparison, something like the following (depending on the database):

where date >= sysdate

or

where date >= now()

or

where date >= getdate()

The where clause goes after the from clause.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.