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I've implemented a repository pattern in my application and in some of my controllers I use a variety of different repositories. (No IoC implemented)

UsersRepository Users;
OtherRepository Other;
Other1Repository Other1;   

public HomeController()
{
     this.Users = new UsersRepository();
     this.Other = new OtherRepository();
     this.Other1 = new Other1Repository();
}

To avoid future issues of bloated controller constructors, I created a wrapper class that contains all the repositories as objects of the class and I call a single instance of this class in my controller constructors.

public class Repositories
{
    UsersRepository Users;
    OtherRepository Other;
    Other1Repository Other1;

    public Repositores()
    {
         this.Users = new UsersRepository();
         this.Other = new OtherRepository();
         this.Other1 = new Other1Repository();
    }
}

In Controller:

Repositories Reps;

public HomeController()
{
     this.Reps= new Repositories();
}

Will this impact the performance of my application now or in the future when the application is expected to grow.

Each repository creates its own DataContext/Entities so for 10 repositories, thats 10 different DataContexts/Entities.

Is DataContext/Entitie an expensive object to create in such a large number?

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You might be better off only creating the repositories when you use them, instead of in the constructor.

private UsersRepository _usersRepository;
private  UsersRepository UsersRepository
{
    get
    {
        if(_usersRepository == null)
        {
            _usersRepository = new UsersRepository();
        }
        return _usersRepository;
    }
}

Then use the property instead of the field for accessing.

share|improve this answer
    
The second "private" should be public correct? – Omar Oct 29 '09 at 20:51
1  
Either is fine. In your example, your fields were private, so I made the property private. But it could be made public if that's what you need. – NotDan Oct 29 '09 at 23:03

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