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I want to auto scale some data. So, I want to pass through all the data and find the maximum extents of the data. Then I want to go through the data, do calculations, and send the results to opengl for rendering. Is this type of multipass thing possible in opencl? Or does the CPU have to direct the "find extents" calc, get the results, and then direct the other calc with that?

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Yes, of course it is possible. Otherwise it would be a huge design flaw. You copy data to the GPU, run calculations on it and return the results, whether it is one or a million calculations in between. – ddriver May 9 '13 at 15:06
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It sounds like you would need two OpenCL kernels, one for calculating the min and max and the other to actually scale the data. Using OpenCL command queues and events you can queue up these two kernels in order and store the results from the first in global memory, reading those results in the second kernel. The semantics of OpenCL command queues (assuming you don't have out-of-order execution enabled) will ensure that one completes before the other without any interaction from your host application (see clEnqueueNDRangeKernel). – agrippa May 9 '13 at 20:43
    
@agrippa please put that as an answer so I can accept it. Thanks! – taotree May 10 '13 at 16:08
up vote 0 down vote accepted

It sounds like you would need two OpenCL kernels, one for calculating the min and max and the other to actually scale the data. Using OpenCL command queues and events you can queue up these two kernels in order and store the results from the first in global memory, reading those results in the second kernel. The semantics of OpenCL command queues and events (assuming you don't have out-of-order execution enabled) will ensure that one completes before the other without any interaction from your host application (see clEnqueueNDRangeKernel).

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