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I have the following tuple of dictionaries:

td=({'associatedFrame': None,
     'cyclicModeNumber': None,
     'description': 'Increment     10: Arc Length =   7.2813E-02',
     'domain': 'ARC_LENGTH',
     'fieldOutputs': 'Repository object',
     'frameId': 10,
     'frameValue': 0.0728124976158142,
     'frequency': None,
     'incrementNumber': 10,
     'isImaginary': False,
     'loadCase': None,
     'mode': None})

I'd like to get the value associated with the key frameId. I don't have many experience with tuples and dictionaries and the questions I've found were about dictionaries of tuples, so I ask for your help. Thanks

EDIT: Actually I had already tried your solution but I forgot to mention I'm using python to get results from another program. This program has a specific organisation so in order to work I had to write td.frameId.

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1  
td["frameId"] –  Ashwini Chaudhary May 9 '13 at 15:18
    
@AshwiniChaudhary: Thanks!! –  jpcgandre May 9 '13 at 15:18

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If this is really what you have, it is just a dictionary.

td['frameId']

will work. Parenthesis don't make a tuple. The comma is what makes a tuple.

foo = (1) #integer
foo = (1,) #1 element tuple
foo = 1, #1 element tuple

Parenthesis are only necessary in a few situations where the syntax would otherwise be ambiguous (like function calls). Clearly:

foo(1,2,3)

is different than;

foo(1,(2,3))

If you actually have a tuple, then you need to index it to get the dictionary which you can index to get the item you want.

td[0]['frameId']
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That's not a tuple, it's just a quiet dict ... i.e. a dict in (useless) parentheses.

td['frameId'] to lookup the key.

Note:

({'this': 'would be a dict in a tuple'},)

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You could use a list comprehension:

matches = [ d for d in td if d['frameID'] == DESIRED_VALUE ]

(Assuming td actually has more than one dictionary; your example is just a single dictionary in a redundant pair of parentheses.)

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You are not using a tuple of dictionaries, td is a dictionary itself. Then if you want to get the td value with td['frameId'].

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td=({'associatedFrame': None,
     'cyclicModeNumber': None,
     'description': 'Increment     10: Arc Length =   7.2813E-02',
     'domain': 'ARC_LENGTH',
     'fieldOutputs': 'Repository object',
     'frameId': 10,
     'frameValue': 0.0728124976158142,
     'frequency': None,
     'incrementNumber': 10,
     'isImaginary': False,
     'loadCase': None,
     'mode': None})

print(td['frameId'])

Maybe you missed the ''.

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The quick answer:

td.get('frameId')

The long answer:

It's actually really easy! Tuples are considered to be immutable objects in Python (aka once created you are 'locked' out from making changes) , whereas dictionaries are Pythons way of doing a hash table.

That aside, your example is NOT a tuple.

In order to make a Python tuple you would have needed to have done:

td=({'associatedFrame': None, 'cyclicModeNumber': None, 'description': 'Increment     10: Arc Length =   7.2813E-02', 'domain': 'ARC_LENGTH', 'fieldOutputs': 'Repository object', 'frameId': 10, 'frameValue': 0.0728124976158142, 'frequency': None, 'incrementNumber': 10, 'isImaginary': False, 'loadCase': None, 'mode': None},)

What's different you ask? See the trailing , after your closing brace on the dictionary and BEFORE the end-parens? This is Python's way of making a tuple. What you have is a PURE Python dictionary, wrapped in parens - and the parens are not really doing anything for you. NB: In this case, the trailing comma is needed because you only have ONE element in the tuple. Had you had multiple elements, then the trailing comma would not be necessary.

But let's assume that you want a nested dictionary inside a tuple, and you did it correctly, you need to first get access to the dictionary WITHIN the tuple - this is accomplished by using the index.

So, for instance, if you had the following

sampleTuple = ([0, 1, 2], "abc", {"test": "meout", "again": "andagain"})

Which put another way, in idiomatic proto-programming nomenclature (=P) would be:

sampleTuple = (LIST_OBJECT, STIRNG_OBJECT, DICTIONARY_OBJECT)

You can gain access to the first element (the LIST_OBJECT) by doing:

sampleTuple[0]

This will return the list:

[0, 1, 2]

NB: First element is referenced by it's 'offset' value, which in this case, an offset of "0" represents the beginning of the tuple.

The second element can be reached by doing:

sampleTuple[1]

This will return the string:

"abc"

And so on and so on...

It looks like this:

Index Values   |-----0----|  |-----1-----|  |-------2--------|
sampleTuple = (LIST_OBJECT, STIRNG_OBJECT, DICTIONARY_OBJECT)

In your case (had you had the trialing comma), you have ONE nested object (dictionary) within a tuple. So you need to get access to it by doing the same type of 'offset' approach mentioned above:

td[0]

This will yield the dictionary:

{'associatedFrame': None, 
'cyclicModeNumber': None, 
'description': 'Increment     10: Arc Length =   7.2813E-02', 
'domain': 'ARC_LENGTH', 
'fieldOutputs': 'Repository object', 
'frameId': 10, 
'frameValue': 0.0728124976158142, 
'frequency': None, 
'incrementNumber': 10, 
'isImaginary': False, 
'loadCase': None, 'mode': None}

Now, the fun part is using dictionary methods in python. There are several ways you can go at it, but I've found the 'safest' way is to use dict.get().

This is my sample output...

>>> td=({'associatedFrame': None, 'cyclicModeNumber': None, 'description': 'Increment     10: Arc Length =   7.2813E-02', 'domain': 'ARC_LENGTH', 'fieldOutputs': 'Repository object', 'frameId': 10, 'frameValue': 0.0728124976158142, 'frequency': None, 'incrementNumber': 10, 'isImaginary': False, 'loadCase': None, 'mode': None},)
>>> type(td)
<type 'tuple'>
>>> new_td = td[0]
>>> type(new_td)
<type 'dict'>
>>> new_td.get('frameId')
10

By using dict.get() (as opposed to popping, indexing, or doing a generator to iterate and find - which is just plain wasteful and innefecient) you are get to use some of Pythons builtins as they are designed.

Additionally, it gives you greater control over the return value because if the key does not exist in the dictionary it will return None. Because most programmers like to be more robust, this is the beginning of doing any sort of error catching!

As a nicety, you are also given the ability to set the default value should it not return what you expect it to. For instance:

new_td.get('frameSurpriseID', "Sorry, it doesn't exist!")

Because frameSurpriseID is not a key in the dictionary new_td then there is no associated value and so it would TYPICALLY return None (False). However, because you passed the second positional (in this case, it's the default return value), it will instead return Sorry, it doesn't exist.

WARNING

Other answers have proposed indexing as a way to extract values from a dictionary. This is fine if you know that your dictionary will ALWAYS have the same key:value pairs. However, observer the behavior under the following circumstance:

>>> new_td['myKey']

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#22>", line 1, in <module>
    new_td['myKey']
KeyError: 'myKey'

Which is why I recommend using the Python dictionary method .get() (more control, more robust IMHO).

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source material can be found here: docs.python.org/2/library/stdtypes.html#dict.get and a tutorial found here: tutorialspoint.com/python/dictionary_get.htm –  Justin Carroll May 9 '13 at 16:24

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