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This probably has a simple explanation I'm failing to see, but why is the following code legal:

    public struct Foo
    {
        const object nullObject = null;

        public override string ToString()
        {
            if (nullObject == null)
            {
                return base.ToString();
            }

        }
    }

While the following,

    public struct Foo
    {
        const dynamic nullObject = null;

        public override string ToString()
        {
            if (nullObject == null)
            {
                return base.ToString();
            }

        }
    }

gives the following compile time error: Foo.ToString()': not all code paths return a value?

Why does the fact that nullObject being dynamic makes the compiler not be able to assert that nullObject will always be null?

EDIT: Expanding on the question, and based on smoore's answer, why does the compiler allow dynamic const fields to begin with? Isn't it kind of self defeating? I know this scenario has no real application at all and it's frankly quite pointless but I stumbled upon it by sheer accident and just got curious.

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1  
why does the compiler allow dynamic const fields to begin with? Because technically it allows const to be applied to any type of field. As with any feature the question is not "why didn't they implement this feature that I want?" it's "why should they implement this feature that I want?" In this case the feature is to explicitly prohibit a const field from being dynamic. As with most feature requests, the answer would most likely be, "it just isn't worth the time and effort; there were more important features to add". This is going quite out of your way to shoot yourself in the foot. –  Servy May 9 '13 at 18:16

1 Answer 1

Because dynamic objects are not resolved at compile time, so the compiler has no idea that it will always be null. The dynamic object won't be resolved until run time.

EDIT:

I see your confusion, why even allow a const dynamic?

My guess is that the Dynamic could be changed to a non-nullable type, in which case ToString would not return a value, but that's just a guess. I'm also thinking that you might still want to have the ability to have a constant dynamic, so that you can ensure the value won't change outside of the static constructor, but not know the type until run-time.

Another possibility, as Servy point out, is that it's such a corner-case that it's not worth fixing.

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I understand that but then, why allow dynamic const fields to begin with? The whole point is that const can't be more static. –  InBetween May 9 '13 at 16:05
    
@Tejas: No, that code won't compile. Reference const fields can only be initialized to null except string which has always been a special class. Value types can only be initialized to constant expressiones to begin with. –  InBetween May 9 '13 at 16:17
    
@Tejas Except that const values have to be evaluated at compile-time, so they can't call any methods. –  Jeremy Todd May 9 '13 at 16:18
    
oh well never mind then. –  Tejas Sharma May 9 '13 at 16:18

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