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Here's some code that (obviously) doesn't compile:

var q = from x in myAnonymousTypeCollection
        select new {
          x.ID,
          CalcField = { 
                        switch(x.SomeField) {
                          case 1:
                            return Math.Sqrt(x.Field1);
                          case 2:
                            return Math.Pow(x.Field2, 2);
                          default:
                            return x.Field3;
                        }
                      }
        };

You get the picture; I'm trying to calculate CalcField in a completely different way, depending on what the value of SomeField is. I can't use a Func<> (or can I?), because the input type is anonymous. So what's the right syntax to get this to work?

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Is this Linq to Objects? –  cadrell0 May 9 '13 at 16:40
1  
Use a lambda or an anonymous function. –  It'sNotALie. May 9 '13 at 16:40
    
@ofstream - I know I could do it using a lambda, but for reasons of readability in my actual code, I want to use query syntax. –  Shaul Behr May 9 '13 at 16:42
    
@cadrell0 - all code is being executed in local memory; it's not going to SQL and doesn't need a translation. –  Shaul Behr May 9 '13 at 16:42
1  
Make a function? –  It'sNotALie. May 9 '13 at 16:44

3 Answers 3

First off, I usually prefer the method chain syntax over the query syntax for Linq. With that you can do this easily.

var q = myAnonymousTypeCollection
    .Select(x => 
            {
                object calcField; 

                 switch(x.SomeField) 
                 {
                      case 1:
                        calcField = Math.Sqrt(x.Field1);
                      case 2:
                        calcField =  Math.Pow(x.Field2, 2);
                      default:
                        calcField = x.Field3;

                 return new 
                        {
                            x.ID,
                            CalcField = calcField
                        };
            });

Without using method chains, you need either a method or an Func. Let's assume a Func

//replace these with actual types if you can.
Func<dynamic, dynamic> calculateField = 
    x => 
    {
        switch(x.SomeField) {
            case 1:
                return Math.Sqrt(x.Field1);
            case 2:
                return Math.Pow(x.Field2, 2);
            default:
                return x.Field3;
    }

var q = from x in myAnonymousTypeCollection
        select new { x.Id, CalcField = calculateField(x) };

Note: I didn't write this in an IDE, so please excuse any simple errors.

Here is the MSDN for dynamic. However, I have found that once you need to start passing anonymous types around, it is best to make an actual class.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Ooh, sneaky, using dynamic! I prefer strong types though, and so far I'm going with the first option (lambda syntax). Waiting for a valid query syntax (if one exists) before giving you answer credit. :-) –  Shaul Behr May 9 '13 at 16:54

You could wrap your anonymous function as a (self-executing) Func<> delegate. This assumes you know the return type.

var q = from x in myAnonymousTypeCollection
    select new {
      ID = x.ID,
      CalcField = new Func<double>( () => { 
                    switch(x.SomeField) {
                      case 1:
                        return Math.Sqrt(x.Field1);
                      case 2:
                        return Math.Pow(x.Field2, 2);
                      default:
                        return x.Field3;
                    }
                  } )()
    };
share|improve this answer
    
+1: that's nice! the concept is kind of similar with javascript: execute anonymous function: (function(){...})(); –  Cuong Le May 9 '13 at 16:48
    
Note that in a situation like this it's probably best from a readability/maintenance standpoint to extract this out to a named function that you simply call in the LINQ query, even though this will work. –  Servy May 9 '13 at 16:49
    
+1 very nice. What if the return type is also anonymous? :-) –  Shaul Behr May 9 '13 at 17:08

You could quite easily move the switch logic out into another function like so:

private static T GetReturnValue<T>(myClass x)
{
    switch (x)
    {
        case 1:
            return Math.Sqrt(x.Field1);
            break;
        case 2:
            return Math.Pow(x.Field2,
                            2);
            break;
        default:
            return x.Field3;
            break;
    }
}

And then you just need to pass your object to that function to get back the value you want:

var q = from x in myAnonymousTypeCollection
                    select new
                        {
                            ID = x.ID,
                            CalcField = GetReturnValue(x)
                        };
share|improve this answer
    
Sure, that would be easy if I had a defined type, like you do (myClass). But I'm using an anonymous type... –  Shaul Behr May 9 '13 at 16:57

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