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I am writing to a file, using ofstream. The writes are very rapid for one thing, file is closed and opened extremely frequently. Below is the code:

if( !(IS_ERROR(wcstombs_s( (size_t*)&out, fileRegNot, 1536, finalizedMessage, 1536 ))) )
        {
            while(reportTransferInProgress);

            regFileBeingWritten = TRUE;

            if(fileRegReportSent)
            {
                file.open("C:\\fileRegLog.txt", ios::out);

                fileRegReportSent = FALSE;
            }
            else
                file.open("C:\\fileRegLog.txt", ios::out | ios::app);

            if(file.is_open() && file.good() && !file.fail() && !file.bad())
            {
                file<<fileRegNot<<"\n";

                file.close();
            }

            regFileBeingWritten = FALSE;
        }

The access violation occurs at the statement "file.close()". The program breaks and the compiler jumps to the following code in the standard fstream file (the highlighted line is where it breaks):

enter image description here

This is the call stack(startRecievingNotifications is the name of the function i wrote in which the file is being written):

enter image description here

Now these are the states of the local variables in the fstream file's code segment:

enter image description here

here the _Myfile variable seems to not point to any valid memory location, probably the problem right? But when you go back to where the function was originally called from my code i.e "file.close()" that i pasted in the beginning, these are the states of the local variables:

enter image description here

Here the _Myfile variable clearly has a valid memory location and data in it. What am i doing wrong? I have used all the checks i could possibly think of before writing and closing the file:

if(file.is_open() && file.good() && !file.fail() && !file.bad())
        {
            file<<fileRegNot<<"\n";

            file.close();
        }

Also, the error doesn't occur very frequently. Sometimes it won't occur for like multiple minutes while the files are being continuously written and sometimes it just pops up as soon as the application is executed.

This is the original error statement:

enter image description here

What exactly am i doing wrong here?

EDIT: (complete function code)

    DWORD WINAPI 
startRecievingNotifications(
    _In_ LPVOID lpArg
    )
{
    HANDLE hComPort = *((HANDLE*)lpArg);
    HRESULT hr;
    SIMPLE_MESSAGE MessageEnvelop;
    TCHAR processName[MAX_PATH];
    WCHAR finalizedMessage[1536];
    WCHAR pId[7];
    INT pid, out;
    ofstream file;

    for(;;)
    {
        hr = FilterGetMessage(hComPort, &MessageEnvelop.MessageHeader, sizeof(SIMPLE_MESSAGE), NULL);

        if(!IS_ERROR(hr) && checkMessage(MessageEnvelop.Message.Contents))
        {
            for(INT i = 0, j = 0; MessageEnvelop.Message.Contents[i] != '\0' && i < 1535; i++, j++)
            {
                if(i == 0)
                {
                    for(; MessageEnvelop.Message.Contents[i] != '#' && i < 6; i++)
                        pId[i] = MessageEnvelop.Message.Contents[i];

                    pId[i] = '\0';

                    pid = _wtoi(pId);

                    if(getProcessName(pid, processName, TRUE))
                    {

                        for(j = 0; processName[j] != '\0'; j++)
                            finalizedMessage[j] = processName[j];
                    }
                    else
                        i = 0;
                }

                finalizedMessage[j] = MessageEnvelop.Message.Contents[i];

                if(MessageEnvelop.Message.Contents[i + 1] == '\0')
                    finalizedMessage[j + 1] = '\0';
                }

            finalizedMessage[1535] = '\0';

            appendSystemTime(finalizedMessage);

            if( !(IS_ERROR(wcstombs_s( (size_t*)&out, fileRegNot, 1536, finalizedMessage, 1536 ))) )
            {
                while(reportTransferInProgress);

                regFileBeingWritten = TRUE;

                if(fileRegReportSent)
                {
                    file.open("C:\\fileRegLog.txt", ios::out);

                    fileRegReportSent = FALSE;
                }
                else
                    file.open("C:\\fileRegLog.txt", ios::out | ios::app);

                if(file.is_open() && file.good() && !file.fail() && !file.bad())
                {
                    file<<fileRegNot<<"\n";

                    file.close();
                }

                regFileBeingWritten = FALSE;
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
For the bigger images to view them better right click and open them in a new window/tab etc. –  user1831704 May 9 '13 at 16:55
    
Looks like memory corruption, as you have a bad address on those last two error lines. Are you doing any manual buffer manipulation, like wctombs? –  RandyGaul May 9 '13 at 17:01
1  
Not the actual problem but I would use if(file) instead of if(file.is_open() && file.good() && !file.fail() && !file.bad()) –  Aleph May 9 '13 at 17:11
1  
while(reportTransferInProgress); looks dubious. Is this multihtreaded? –  Peter Wood May 9 '13 at 17:12
1  
"But besides this piece of code, the rest is error free and has been thoroughly tested." Alarm bells are ringing. –  Johnsyweb Dec 31 '13 at 3:56

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