Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a somewhat bizarre requirement for a new Rails application. I need to build an application in which all routes are defined in multiple namespaces (let me explain). I want to have an application in which school subjects (math, english, etc) are the namespaces:

%w[math english].each do |subject|
  namespace subject.to_sym do
    resources :students
  end
end

This is great and it works but it requires me to create a namespaced StudentsController for each subject which means if I add a new subject then I need to create a new controller.

What I would like is to create a Base::StudentsController and if, let's say the Math::StudentsController exists then it will be used and if it doesn't exist, then we can dynamically create this controller and inherit from Base::StudentsController.

Is this something that is possible? If so then how would I go about implementing this?

share|improve this question
    
I'd just create all of the namespaced controllers and have them inherit from the base controller. Then override as necessary. –  Tom L May 9 '13 at 18:13
    
I realize I can do that but that's going to give me a lot of controllers that will only contain the class declaration. Also, if I have 20 controllers and I want to add a new subject then I need to copy 20 controllers. –  Kyle Decot May 9 '13 at 18:18
    
Right, I see. Is this an actual requirement or is it just an experiment? Because the fluidity of "math", "english" and whatever else comes along doesn't lend itself to namespacing. What about inverting it (students/math)? At that point, what you've really got is a controller action. Now that might lend itself better to dynamicism. –  Tom L May 9 '13 at 18:24
    
This is a requirement (not mine but rather my many bosses). –  Kyle Decot May 9 '13 at 19:04
    
Can you say a little more about what you mean by "dynamically create this controller"? –  maxenglander May 12 '13 at 21:39
show 3 more comments

6 Answers

With routes defined this way:

%w[math english].each do |subject|
  scope "/#{subject}" do
    begin
      "#{subject.camelcase}::StudentsController".constantize
      resources :students, controller: "#{subject}::students", only: :index
    rescue
      resources :students, controller: "base::students", only: :index
    end
  end
end

rake routes outputs:

students GET /math/students(.:format)    base::students#index
         GET /english/students(.:format) english::students#index

if english/students_controller.rb is present and math/students_controller. is absent.

share|improve this answer
    
This seems rather verbose and this would need to be done for every single resource in my application. –  Kyle Decot May 10 '13 at 12:02
    
I can only suggest creating method like this pastebin.com/rLLZpCYx, but I guess you won't be satisfied. –  Shamir K. May 10 '13 at 17:18
add comment

To restate your requirements:

  1. Minimal declarations per subject/resource pair
  2. Use dedicated controller (Math::StudentsController) if it exists, otherwise use base controller (StudentsController)

Rails expects each route to have a dedicated controller, and doesn't really have a good way to support the second requirement. So, this is how I would do it:

Dynamicroutes::Application.routes.draw do
  SUBJECTS = [ "math", "english", "chemistry" ]
  RESOURCES = [ "assignments", "students" ]

  class DedicatedSubjectResourceControllerConstraint
    def initialize(subject, resource)
      @subject = subject
      @resource = resource
    end

    def matches?(request)
      begin
        defined?("#{@subject.capitalize}::#{@resource.capitalize}")
        return true
      rescue NameError
        Rails.logger.debug "No such class: #{@subject.capitalize}::#{@resource.capitalize}"
        return false
      end
    end
  end

  class ValidSubjectConstraint
    def matches?(request)
      return SUBJECTS.include?(request.path_parameters[:subject])
    end
  end

  SUBJECTS.each do |subject|
    RESOURCES.each do |resource|      
      namespace subject, :constraints => DedicatedSubjectResourceControllerConstraint.new(subject, resource) do
        resources resource
      end
    end
  end

  RESOURCES.each do |resource|
    scope "/:subject", :constraints => ValidSubjectConstraint.new do
      resources resource
    end
  end
end
share|improve this answer
add comment

This sounds like a use for const_missing. If what you want to do is

to create a Base::StudentsController

and if, let's say the Math::StudentsController exists

then it will be used

and if it doesn't exist, then we can dynamically create this controller and inherit from Base::StudentsController

You can achieve that by adding dynamic constant lookup (const_missing) and dynamic constant definition with inheritance (Object.const_set).

I imagine something like this; with a few tweaks and more rigorous checking, would work:

# initializers/dynamic_controllers.rb

class ActionDispatch::Routing::RouteSet

  SUBJECTS = [ "math", "english", "chemistry" ]

  def const_missing(name, *args, &block)
    if SUBJECTS.any?{ |subject| name.include? subject.uppercase }
      Object.const_set name, Class.new(Base::StudentsController)
    else
      super
    end
  end

end

That'll add dynamic constant lookups to ActionDispatch::Routing::RouteSet, from which Dynamicroutes::Application.routes inherits, so undefined constants in Dynamicroutes::Application.routes.draw will generate the corresponding classes subclassed from Base::StudentsController.

share|improve this answer
    
I've added this initializer and restarted my application but this doesn't seem to be getting called. Any ideas? –  Kyle Decot May 16 '13 at 14:17
    
Not sure. Let me create a dummy app to play around in. –  Chris Keele May 16 '13 at 17:49
add comment

I believe this will do it:

  %w[math english].each do |subject|
    namespace subject.to_sym do
      resources :students
    end
  end

  match ':subject/students(/:action(/:id))' => 'base/students'

With these combined routes, /math/students goes to the Math::StudentsController, /english/students/ goes to the English::StudentsController, and all other subjects (e.g. /physics/students and /cs/students) go to the Base::StudentsController.

Which I think is exactly what you want and only adds one line of code to your original solution.

share|improve this answer
add comment

All the routing helpers like resources, scope, etc are just functions inside your application's routes. You could just define a custom function as follows:

YourApplication.routes.draw do

  # Let's define a custom method that you're going to use for your specific needs
  def resources_with_fallback(*args, &block)
    target_module       = @scope[:module].camelize.constantize
    target_controller   = "#{args.first.to_s}_controller".camelize
    fallback_controller = args.last.delete(:fallback).to_s.camelize.constantize

    # Create the target controller class
    # using fallback_controller as the superclass
    # if it doesn't exist
    unless target_module.const_defined?(target_controller)
      target_module.const_set target_controller, Class.new(fallback_controller)
    end

    # Call original resources method
    resources *args, &block
  end

  # Now go ahead and define your routes!

  namespace "test" do
    namespace "new" do
      # Use our custom_resources function and pass a fallback parameter
      custom_resources :photos, :fallback => 'base/some_controller'
    end
  end

end

I tested this in Rails 3.2, but it should equally work well in all 3.x versions.

I included no null checks or begin/rescue blocks anywhere. Since you're going to use this custom function only when required, I'm assuming that you will pass the correct and necessary parameters. If say you passed a fallback controller that doesn't exist, I'd rather that the routes parsing fail with an exception, rather than trying to handle it.

Edit: Typo in function arguments

Edit 2: Forgot &block in function arguments

Edit 3: Add "_controller" to the target_controller variable

share|improve this answer
    
Note: @scope[:module] is a built-in variable in the Route class in Rails. I'm using it to get the current module that we're nested into. The same scope is also used by the resources function, and most other functions within the routes file. –  RDX May 16 '13 at 20:58
    
This doesn't work for the OP or for me. It doesn't work for the OP because he wants to be creating top-level constants so @scope[:module].camelize.constantize generates an error (uninitialized constant). It doesn't work for me because even if Test is defined, this fails because @scope[:module] == 'test/new', not 'test'. Yes, you could fix these problems, but now it's getting complicated and it is generating fake classes so they can receive messages that are being meta-programatically generated in the first place. Too much magic. –  Old Pro May 18 '13 at 4:54
add comment
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I ended up writing some custom logic into ActionDispatch::Routing::RouteSet::Dispatcher.controller_reference. I attempt to look up all of the constants required for the given controller and create them if they're missing. This code is FAR from perfect so please feel free to edit w/ improvements.

class ActionDispatch::Routing::RouteSet::Dispatcher

  private

  def controller_reference(controller_param)
    const_name = @controller_class_names[controller_param] ||= "#{controller_param.camelize}Controller"

    obj = Object
    const_name.split('::').each do |cn|
      begin
        obj =  obj.const_get(cn)
      rescue
        if obj == Object
          obj =  obj.const_set(cn, Class.new(ApplicationController))
        else
          puts "Creating #{obj}::#{cn} based on Generic::#{cn}"
          obj =  obj.const_set(cn, Class.new("Generic::#{cn}".constantize))
        end
      end
    end

    ActiveSupport::Dependencies.constantize(const_name)
  end

end
share|improve this answer
    
Take another look at my answer and I think you will like it even more. –  Old Pro May 18 '13 at 3:56
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.