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I'm trying to add an array's members back to itself using a for loop.

Why does this code cause an unresponsive script?

var magicarray = {

    arraymemeber: [1, 2, 3, 4, 5],

    duplicate: function () {
        for (var i = 0; i < this.arraymemeber.length; i++) {
            this.arraymemeber.push(this.arraymemeber[i]);
        };
    }
};

console.log(magicarray.duplicate());
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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Though I'm not sure why you want this, to avoid an infinite loop that you currently have get the length first and iterate only over the original length of the array.

var magicarray = {

    arraymemeber: [1,2,3,4,5],

    duplicate: function() {

        var length = this.arraymemeber.length;

        for (var i = 0; i < length; i++) {
            this.arraymemeber.push(this.arraymemeber[i]);
        };
    }
};

console.log(magicarray.duplicate());
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1  
+1 as using a cached value in general in a for loop is preferred regardless if adding or removing items. Re-evaluating the .length of on an array each iteration can be very expensive. –  François Wahl May 9 '13 at 19:16
1  
@FrançoisWahl: It's not very expensive on Arrays. It's just a property lookup. On "live" DOM collections, it can be expensive. –  squint May 9 '13 at 19:17
    
@squint: I only recently read "High Performance JavaScript" and under the Algorithm Flow Control section it had some example on caching the length in regard to minimizing array item lookups. It says: Depending on the length of the array, you can save around 25% off the total loop execution time in most browsers (and up to 50% in Internet Explorer). I run it past a jsPerf as well here: jsperf.com/length-property-vs-cached-length .The savings are smaller there as the array is smaller but I assume that difference would get exponentially bigger as the array gets bigger. –  François Wahl May 9 '13 at 19:33
1  
@DavidBarker: I didn't mean to discount squint's comment and no offense was intended :). Squint is right, the penalty is very minimal. Hence I only said it can be very expensive. Specially when looking at IE's performance difference. Running the jsPerf example in Chrome and FF turns out pretty even and caching makes nearly zero difference alright. Running it in IE9 though, re-evaluating the length is about 40% slower which was amazing to see. –  François Wahl May 9 '13 at 19:44
1  
@FrançoisWahl: Certainly no offence was taken. :) But the size of the Array shouldn't make a difference. It's a cached property that is set when the Array is mutated. Even then, all it really does is store the highest index + 1. So foo = []; foo[100000] = "bar"; is still just an Array with 1 member, even though it's .length will return 100001. DOM "live" lists require an analysis of the DOM though, so those can be more expensive... and IE is just IE! ;) –  squint May 9 '13 at 20:30

Because you're pushing new items in as you iterate, and your condition is based on the current .length, causing an infinite iteration (or at least as high as the .length will be allowed to go).


If you wanted to "double" the Array, you don't need a loop. You can do this:

this.arraymember.push.apply(this.arraymember, this.arraymember)

So your object would be:

var magicarray = {

    arraymemeber: [1, 2, 3, 4, 5],

    duplicate: function () {
        this.arraymember.push.apply(this.arraymember, this.arraymember)
    }
};
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1  
+1 I never would have thought on using apply to push the whole array into itself like that. Nice. –  François Wahl May 9 '13 at 19:54

Every time you go around the loop, you put an item onto the array. This increases its length by 1.

Since this.arraymemeber.length increases at the same rate as i, you never get to the end of the loop.

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Because in each iteration you're adding a new element to the element you're iterating over.

The i < this.arraymemeber.length check is made at the end of each iteration. The length of the array isn't cached in any way.

To prevent an infinite loop, use

for (var i = 0, len = this.arraymemeber.length; i<len; i++) {

... instead.

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Just do this:

this.arraymemeber = this.arraymemeber.concat(this.arraymemeber);
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7  
He asks what's wrong, not for the solution –  RnD May 9 '13 at 19:13

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