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Is this possible in PHP?

try{

  $obj = new Clas();

  if($obj->foo){
    // how to exit from this try block?
  }

  // do other stuff here

}catch(Exception $e){

]

I know I can put the other stuff between {}, but that increases indenting on a bigger code block and I don't like it :P

share|improve this question
    
throw('Get me out of here!') will jump out. but that's not exactly nice. –  Marc B May 9 '13 at 19:31
1  
can't you just use else after the if? –  MattyF May 9 '13 at 19:32
    
@MattyF - +1, sounds like an answer to me ! –  adeneo May 9 '13 at 19:33
    
I can't see any reasonable use of this? Is it just me? –  bestprogrammerintheworld May 9 '13 at 19:33
1  
@bestprogrammerintheworld - This is'nt North Korea, feel free to think the same as me whenever you like ! –  adeneo May 9 '13 at 19:36

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I know this increases indentation but is an answer

try
{
    $obj = new Clas();
    if ($obj->foo)
    {
        // do stuff here
    }
    else
    {
        // do other stuff here
    }
}
catch (Exception $e)
{
     // handle exception here
}
share|improve this answer

With a goto of course!

try {

  $obj = new Clas();

  if ($obj->foo) {
    goto break_free_of_try;
  }

  // do other stuff here

} catch(Exception $e) {

}
break_free_of_try:
share|improve this answer

Well, there is no reason for that, but you can have fun forcing an exception in your try block, stopping execution of your function.

try {
   if ($you_dont_like_something){
     throw new Exception();
     //No code will be executed after the exception has been thrown.
   }
} catch (Exception $e){
    echo "Something went wrong";
}
share|improve this answer

Couldn't you just do like this?

try{

  $obj = new Clas();

  if(!$obj->foo){
  // do other stuff here
  }


}catch(Exception $e){

}
share|improve this answer

I also faced this situation, and like you, didn't want countless if/else if/else if/else statements as it makes the code less readable.

I ended up extending the Exception class with my own. The example class below was for validation problems that when triggered would produce a less severe 'log notice'

class ValidationEx extends Exception
{
    public function __construct($message, $code = 0, Exception $previous = null)
    {
        parent::__construct($message, $code, $previous);
    }

    public function __toString()
    {
        return __CLASS__ . ": [{$this->code}]: {$this->message}\n";
    }
}

In my main code I call it;

throw new ValidationEx('You maniac!');

Then at the end of the Try statement I have

        catch(ValidationEx $e) { echo $e->getMessage(); }
        catch(Exception $e){ echo $e->getMessage(); }

Happy for comments and criticisms, we're all here to learn!

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