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I'm trying to use a :has_many :through type association, but I'm getting the following error:

ActiveRecord::StatementInvalid: SQLite3::SQLException: no such column: work_units.developer_id:

Many other posts about this sort of thing have just had spelling mistakes, but I've checked mine.

class Developer < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :skype_name, :language_ids, :user_attributes

  has_many :work_units
  has_many :projects, :through => :work_units
  ...
end

class Project < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :complete, :description, :finalised, :price

  has_many :work_units
  has_many :developers, :through => :work_units
  ...
end

class WorkUnit < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :hours_worked

  belongs_to :project
  belongs_to :developer
end

I've run db:migrate and it didn't complain. I did make a mistake and had to rollback the db then re-migrate, but I think I did it right. I use the annotate gem and it doesn't show any of the relationship ids I'd expect. So, do I need to create a WorkUnits table or am I missing something? The rails guide didn't mention manually making tables.

Edit

Here's the migration I used to create the WorkUnit model and stuff:

class CreateWorkUnits < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :work_units do |t|
      t.integer :hours_worked, :default => 0
      t.timestamps
    end
  end
end

Edit 2

Snippets from my schema.rb:

create_table "work_units", :force => true do |t|
  t.integer  "hours_worked", :default => 0
  t.datetime "created_at",                  :null => false
  t.datetime "updated_at",                  :null => false
end

create_table "projects", :force => true do |t|
  t.string   "description"
  t.decimal  "price",       :precision => 8, :scale => 2
  t.boolean  "complete",    :default => false
  t.datetime "created_at",  :null => false
  t.datetime "updated_at",  :null => false
end

Similarly for :developers. So, why doesn't my migration add the association information for me?

share|improve this question
    
To rerun annotate: bundle exec annotate. You might need to restart your development server to pick up the database changes. –  Thomas Klemm May 9 '13 at 20:09
1  
For your has_many :through relationship only a table for the WorkUnit class has to exist with project_id and developer_id integer columns. You can check your db/schema.rb whether it is currently defined. –  Thomas Klemm May 9 '13 at 20:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to add the foreign keys to your work_units table.

class CreateWorkUnits < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :work_units do |t|
      t.integer :hours_worked, :default => 0
      t.integer :project_id, null: false
      t.integer :developer_id, null: false
      t.timestamps
    end

    add_index :work_units, :project_id
    add_index :work_units, :developer_id
  end
end

Another way:

class CreateWorkUnits < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :work_units do |t|
      t.integer :hours_worked, :default => 0
      t.belongs_to :project
      t.belongs_to :developer
      t.timestamps
    end

    add_index :work_units, :project_id
    add_index :work_units, :developer_id
  end
end

You can also define these fields when generating your model, then they'll be added to the migration automatically as show in the second snippet.

$ rails g model WorkUnit hours_worked:integer project:belongs_to developer:belongs_to

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer

Your WorkUnit migration should look like this:

class CreateWorkUnits < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :work_units do |t|
      t.integer :hours_worked, :default => 0
      t.references :developer
      t.references :project
      t.timestamps
    end
    add_index :work_units, :developer_id
    add_index :work_units, :project_id
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the answer. Everyone answered so quickly, I don't know who was first. Sorry I didn't give you the points this time –  Mike T May 9 '13 at 20:20
    
for interest's sake, why would you use t.references rather than t.belongs_to or t.integer in @Thomas`s answer? Is there any difference? –  Mike T May 10 '13 at 6:34
    
From the guides: Using t.integer :supplier_id makes the foreign key naming obvious and explicit. In current versions of Rails, you can abstract away this implementation detail by using t.references :supplier instead. and Another helper is called references (also available as belongs_to). In its simplest form it just adds some readability. –  Raindal May 10 '13 at 13:23
    
thanks for the explanation –  Mike T May 10 '13 at 15:10

A table for WorkUnit needs to exist, whether that means it migration was automatically generated via scaffolding or if the migration was manually written by you.

If you don't have a migration yet that creates that table, you'll need to create that migration because the table does need to exist.

share|improve this answer

You do need a work_units table with a project_id and developer_id column.

Have a look at http://xyzpub.com/en/ruby-on-rails/3.2/activerecord_datenbank_anlegen.html if you don't know how to create a table.

share|improve this answer

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