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I'm having some problems with plain old SQL queries (drawback of using ORMs most of the time :)).

I'm having 2 tables, PRODUCTS and RULES. In table RULES I have defined rules for products. What I want is to write a query to get all products which have defined rules.

Rules are defined by 2 ways:

  1. You can specify RULE for only one product (ProductID have value, SectorID is NULL)
  2. You can specify RULE for more that one product using SectorID (ProductID is NULL)

Result need to have all products which have rule (product.ID - rule.ProductID) but also all products that are defined in sectors which are in rules table (product.SectorID - rule.SectorID).

Also, the result can't have duplicate products (products which are defined by productId in RULES or by SectorID)

Example:

PRODUCTS

ID  SectorID
1   1
2   1
3   1
4   2
5   3
6   3

RULES

ID ProductID SectorID
1  1         NULL
4  NULL      1
5  6         NULL

Expected result

PRODUCTS with IDs : 1, 2, 3, 6
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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Simplest way I can think of, but not necessarily the quickest.

SELECT * FROM products AS p WHERE
       EXISTS (SELECT * FROM rules AS r WHERE p.ID = r.ProductID OR p.SectorID = r.SectorID)
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1  
This will probably be the quickest (given relevant indexes). Splitting the OR into two separate EXISTS legs could improve things: WHERE EXISTS ( ... where p.ID = r.ProductID ) OR EXISTS ( ... WHERE p.SectorID = r.SectorID) –  wildplasser May 9 '13 at 21:02
    
@wildplasser As far as I can tell, the query is rewritten as a join anyway with the same plan as the join below. –  Joachim Isaksson May 10 '13 at 16:30
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I believe something like this should work:

SELECT DISTINCT p.id 
FROM Products p
LEFT JOIN Rules r1 ON p.id = r1.productID
LEFT JOIN Rules r2 ON p.SectorID = r2.SectorID
WHERE r1.id IS NOT NULL OR r2.SectorID IS NOT NULL 
ORDER BY p.id;

SQL Fiddle

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Perform both queries and combine the results:

SELECT ProductID FROM Rules
WHERE ProductID IS NOT NULL
UNION
SELECT p.ID FROM Product p 
INNER JOIN Rules r ON p.SectorID = r.SectorID

The UNION will filter out duplicate IDs. Assuming your example is simplified, you can use this as a subquery to get a list of all products with rules, and use that to join against other tables to return the required data.

An alternative approach:

SELECT DISTINCT p.ID FROM Product p 
INNER JOIN Rules r 
ON p.ID = r.ProductID OR p.SectorID = r.SectorID

These may or may not generate different execution plans. You should check, and choose the faster one.

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1  
in your first query the join to the product table is not needed. Just return r.productID. Saving a join is always a good thing ;-) –  Declan_K May 9 '13 at 21:01
1  
and the alternate will get duplicates –  cmd May 9 '13 at 21:01
    
@cmd, Declan_K Indeed; thanks. –  Esoteric Screen Name May 9 '13 at 21:03
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To get the complete product rows for the matching products, it's a simple JOIN. The DISTINCT is required since a product may match both a product rule and a sector rule and you only want it listed once.

SELECT DISTINCT p.* 
FROM products p
JOIN rules r
  ON p.ID       = r.ProductID
  OR p.SectorID = r.SectorID

An SQLfiddle to test with.

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select  distinct
        ProductID
from    rules
where   ProductID is not null
union
select  distinct
        p.id
from    PRODUCTS p
inner join
        RULES r
on      r.sectorid = p.sectorid   

here's the SQL Fiddle

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1  
The use of distinct is unnecessary. The second half of the union won't return any duplicates. The first might, but the union will filter them out, even if the duplicate values don't appear in the second half. –  Esoteric Screen Name May 9 '13 at 21:09
    
Good point. Also, I think Joachim's answer is better than mine. –  Declan_K May 9 '13 at 21:19
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