Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

Here is my question. I have a pointer with allocated memory to some class:

Class *pClass = new Class();

Now I want to pass this object to some function, wich will use this object just to copy it and will not modify it. The question is how to correctly pass the object?

void someFunc (const Class &_class);
{
    Class *pClassInFunc = new Class (_class);
    ...
}
...
someFunc (*pClass)

or

void someFunc (const Class *_class);
{
    Class *pClassInFunc = new Class (*_class);
    ...
}
...
someFunc (pClass)

or

void someFunc (Class _class);
{
    // just use _class since it's already a copy
    ...
}
...
someFunc (*pClass)

I've choosed the first way, but it looks strange to me, smth tells me that it's not correct. The second one looks more C-style (or not?). And the last one creates a copy in the stack, which is not desireable. So, what is the best solution? Thank you for your answers.

EDIT: just saw, I forgot * before pClassInFunc. Corrected, sorry.

share|improve this question
    
Yes. How about using the first way, but do you really need to allocate the class using new? Why not just Class nClass; someFunc(nClass); (using pass by const ref) – Porkbutts May 9 '13 at 21:28
    
The first two snippets aren't valid C++. – Kerrek SB May 9 '13 at 21:43
    
@Porkbutts: This class holds around 3000 double variables. I thought it is more wisely to keep it in heap. – OggY May 10 '13 at 6:23
    
@Kerrek SB: Why? All three methods compile and work without any errors. – OggY May 10 '13 at 6:25
    
@OggY: well yes, after you edited the question... never mind. – Kerrek SB May 10 '13 at 8:06
up vote 4 down vote accepted

I vote for the last approach. Design your function so that it doesn't care exactly how the calling code allocated the object. If it wants a copy, take the object by value. It makes the intentions clearer to the user.

It also allows the caller to move from their object if they don't need it any more. If you were to take a reference to const and then copy it, that wouldn't be an option (you can't move from a const object).

If the calling code can, it should avoid dynamically allocating the object in the first place. Then, if you choose to take the argument by value, it is very simple to pass the object.

share|improve this answer
    
Hm, interesting. Why should I avoid dynamic allocating? I thought it's always a good idea to keep big (20kb is big?) objects in heap then in stack. Especially when they live the whole programm runtime. – OggY May 10 '13 at 6:45
    
@OggY Okay, 20KB is fairly large for a stack object, but not too large. You typically have a limit of 1MB. If the copy is only for the duration of a single function, I wouldn't worry about it. If you're going to have many of these copies on the stack at one time, you might want to do it a different way. In that case, I'd vote for the first method. – Joseph Mansfield May 10 '13 at 10:10
    
Thanks for your answers. I made my desition. I'll keep long-live object in heap, but will provide a stack copy to the func since it's fast enough. – OggY May 10 '13 at 14:59
    
Keep in mind that dynamic allocation is very expensive; every call to 'new' or 'malloc' gives up control to the OS to ask for some memory before it can proceed. – Porkbutts May 10 '13 at 17:14
    
Ok ... You don,t trust me ... Then let's see what Herb Sutter to say about this...herbsutter.com/2013/05/13/gotw-2-solution-temporary-objects in any case copying a 3000 float class does not make for good design ... Or practice ... – Mihai Sebea May 13 '13 at 21:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.