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I am creating an online calculator using JavaScript.

I have this to work out a calculation:

eval(expression).toPrecision(10);

This produces the right output in almost all cases. E.g.

eval('456456+45646486*45646884').toPrecision(10)
// Output: "2.083619852e+15"

eval('1/0').toPrecision(10)
// Output: "Infinity"

However

eval('4*1').toPrecision(10)
// Output: "4.000000000"

How do I trim the trailing zeros but also keep nice outputs above?

share|improve this question
    
numb = (Math.round(numb * 100000000)) / 100000000); – adeneo May 9 '13 at 21:29
    
use Math.floor() – NullPointerException May 9 '13 at 21:32
    
Thanks guys but both these suggestions only cover the 2nd and 3rd examples but now the first example produces "2083619852000000" rather than "2.083619852e+15" – Greg May 9 '13 at 21:36
    
Be sure expression is generated by you and not by a third party. That is, read the input and generate expression based on that, since eval() on unsafe code is unsafe. – 0b10011 Nov 7 '14 at 21:43
up vote 1 down vote accepted

only all-zero decimals

  eval('4*1').toPrecision(10).replace(/\.0+$/,"")

zero ending decimals:

  eval('4.5*1').toPrecision(10).replace(/\.([^0]+)0+$/,".$1")

edit: handle both all zero and ending zero cases

EDIT: if you will ALWAYS use .toPrecision() first, and thus always have a ".", you can trim off any trailing zeros:

  eval('4.5*1').toPrecision(10).replace(/0+$/,"")

EDIT: handling trailing decimals:

eval('4.5*0').toPrecision(10).replace(/\.?0+$/,"")
share|improve this answer
    
Almost, but eval('4+0.0001').toPrecision(10).replace(/\.0+$/,"") gives "4.000100000" rather than "4.0001" – Greg May 9 '13 at 21:38
    
gotcha, added two other options for that. let me know if something more complex is required. – dandavis May 9 '13 at 21:41
    
Regex to the rescue? That last edit I think nailed it! I'll give it a more thorough test and accept if its good to go! Many thanks. – Greg May 9 '13 at 21:43
    
Is there anyway of improving it slightly for whole numbers? i.e. "2" instead of "2."? – Greg May 9 '13 at 21:46
    
@greg: added to answer. i think that last one is THE one, have a good feeling about it... – dandavis May 9 '13 at 22:16

Divide by 1 after using toPrecision. Javascript will trail the zeros, and there's no regexes needed.

share|improve this answer
    
i used this solution like this: val.toFixed(2) / 1 – Samuel K Dec 18 '15 at 10:32

The following replace() call will replace all trailing 0s and a trailing ., if present:

eval(expression).toPrecision(10).replace(/(?:\.0+|(\.\d+?)0+)$/, "$1")

How does it work?

/(?:\.0+|(\.\d+?)0+)$/ looks for \.0+ or (\.\d+?)0+ at the end of the string ($). The ?: prevents \.0+|(\.\d+?)0+ from being "captured".

\.0+ will match . followed by any number of 0s.

(\.\d+?)0+ will match . followed by at least one digit followed by at least one 0. The ? makes sure the 0+ matches as many 0s as possible. The parentheses "capture" the non-0s.

The second parameter on replace() is the new string to replace what was matched. The $1 is a variable of sorts and tells replace() to replace the matched value with the first captured value (because 1 was after the $). In this case, the first captured value was whatever \.\d+? matched.

So, in the end:

  1. . followed by any number of 0s will be discarded
  2. . followed by non-0s followed by 0s will have the 0s discarded

Examples

For comparison of methods for precisions of 1, 2, and 3 for .40*1, 4*1, and 40*1, see below. First (bold) item in each group is this method. Red items are those that don't match expectations.

var tests = [
  '.04*1',
  '.40*1',
  '4*1',
  '40*1'
];
var results = {};
for (var i = 0; i < tests.length; i += 1) {
  results[i] = {};
  for (var p = 1; p < 3; p += 1) {
    results[i][p] = {};
    results[i][p][0] = {
      'output': eval(tests[i]).toPrecision(p).replace(/(?:\.0+|(\.\d+?)0+)$/, "$1"),
      'regex': '/(?:\.0+|(\.\d+?)0+)$/, "$1"'
    };
    results[i][p][1] = {
      'output': eval(tests[i]).toPrecision(p).replace(/\.0+$/, ""),
      'regex': '/\.0+$/, ""'
    };
    results[i][p][2] = {
      'output': eval(tests[i]).toPrecision(p).replace(/\.([^0]+)0+$/, ".$1"),
      'regex': '/\.([^0]+)0+$/, ".$1"'
    };
    results[i][p][3] = {
      'output': eval(tests[i]).toPrecision(p).replace(/0+$/, ""),
      'regex': '/0+$/, ""'
    };
    results[i][p][4] = {
      'output': eval(tests[i]).toPrecision(p).replace(/\.?0+$/, ""),
      'regex': '/\.?0+$/, ""'
    };
  }
}
for (var i in results) {
  $("#result").append("<h1>" + tests[i] + "</h1>");
  for (var p in results[i]) {
    var expected = null;
    for (var t in results[i][p]) {
      var div = $("<div></div>");
      if (t == 0) {
        expected = results[i][p][t].output;
        div.addClass("expected");
      } else if (results[i][p][t].output !== expected) {
        div.addClass("invalid");
      }
      div.append("P" + p + ": " + results[i][p][t].output);
      div.append(" <small>" + results[i][p][t].regex + "</small>");
      $("#result").append(div);
    }
    $("#result").append("<br>");
  }
}
body { font-family: monospace; }
.expected { font-weight: bold; }
.invalid { color: red; }
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.11.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div id="result"></div>

share|improve this answer
    
simply using $2 instead of $1 would simplify and run faster than non-capturing groups. – dandavis Nov 7 '14 at 22:18
    
@dandavis "Simplfy" is subjective. When dealing with complex regex, I find only capturing groups you're actually going to use greatly simplifies things in the long run. And that isn't what I've found with some experimenting. Yes, with Chrome 37, it's faster to use capturing groups, but Firefox 33 seems to perform just as well regardless of the method used. And, a couple of times I ran the test, Firefox performed better with non-capturing groups. – 0b10011 Nov 7 '14 at 22:39

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