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This is about something very basic.

While defining type long long the expression is like.

long long x=5435666LL;

I cant understand why LL is post fixed since even without post-fix its quite clear for the compiler to allocate the right memory space(8 bytes in vc++) which it anyways does in absence of post-fix.

So what purpose does 'LL' post-fix serves?

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3 Answers 3

Your code is equivalent to

long long x;
x = 5435666LL

Without the LL suffix, 5435666 is an int. In either case the result is the same because 5435666 fits in an int, unless you're on a 16 bit platform.

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so please help me on this. Even with or without LL compiler is assigning 8 bytes(memory space for long long type) and not 4 bytes(memory space for int type) so again whats the point of using suffix? –  user1619447 May 9 '13 at 22:00
    
Perhaps habit or consistency so that one also does it for the times when it does matter. –  TheUndeadFish May 10 '13 at 1:01
    
@user1619447: it can matter when you call a function that's overloaded. E.g., if there is void foo(long) and void foo(int), then foo(1L) picks the long overload and foo(1) picks the int overload. Using the L prefix you can force the long overload without having to know if your number fits in an int or not. –  Tobias Brandt May 10 '13 at 8:02

Without a suffix, the compiler will choose the first of int, long int and long long int in which the value will fit. However, you might specifically want a value that would fit in an int to be of long long int type. For that you would use the LL suffix.

Contrived example:

template <typename T>
void foo(T x) {
  static_assert(std::is_same<T, long long>::value, "Must be long long!");
}

int main()
{
    foo(0); // Error because 0 without a suffix is an int
    foo(0LL);
}

To demonstrate that these literals have different sizes (assuming int and long long int have different sizes in your implementation), consider the following example:

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::cout << sizeof(0) << ' ' << sizeof(0LL) << std::endl;
}

For me, this outputs:

4 8
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so please help me on this. Even with or without LL compiler is assigning 8 bytes(memory space for long long type) and not 4 bytes(memory space for int type) so again whats the point of using suffix? –  user1619447 May 9 '13 at 22:00
    
@user1619447 No, without the suffix it's an int if it fits in an int and will use however many bytes an int takes up. With the suffix, it will always take up the number of bytes required for a long long. –  Joseph Mansfield May 9 '13 at 22:03
    
one time I did this long long x= 5435666LL; cout << sizeof(x) << endl; and second time long long x= 5435666LL; cout << sizeof(x) << endl; both giving the result as 8, dosen't it mean it assigning long long irrespective? –  user1619447 May 9 '13 at 22:05
    
@user1619447 You've defined x as a long long. x itself will of course have the size of a long long. It's the integer literal that will be of a different size. –  Joseph Mansfield May 9 '13 at 22:07

In your example it has only a cosmetic purpose.

I can think of the following examle where it could make a difference, because the literal is assumed to be int:

enum {
    Flag1 = 1 << 0,
    Flag2 = 1 << 33,
    Flag3 = 1LL << 33;
}
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