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How do I make it so a button stay clicks after the user has exited the program?

Let's say I have this option(as a JButton) that sets the JTextArea's text to red. The user clicks the button, then exits the program. When the user opens the program back up, the text is red - meaning the button is still clicked.

If you don't get that example, let me show you another one:

I have a JButton, and a JLabel. When the button is clicked, it changes the background of the JLabel to blue. The user clicks the button, then exits the program. When the user opens the program back up, the button is already clicked, meaning the JLabel's background color is blue.

Is there a way I can do that?

Edit: I would prefer if I could do it without loading external files.

Edit 2: I like the idea of using Preference. But, could you give me an examplre for me for one of the examples above? I'm kind of a beginner in Java, so I have a lot of questions. Like, does the code go in the actionPerformed of the button? And, how could I save different kinds of information(JTextarea foreground as red) with Preferences?

share|improve this question
    
For your examples, I'd set the values when you create the JTextArea. You can do it by doing prefs.get("area's previous color", Color.WHITE); This will make it return WHITE if this is the first time the program has been run. Otherwise, it will return the thing you put in there. Then every time the color changes, put the prefs.put in the actionPerformed. –  Daniel Kaplan May 9 '13 at 23:39
    
I need it to change colors ONLY when a button has been clicked. –  user2228462 May 9 '13 at 23:42
    
I read a few years ago that preferences are stored in the registry if you have windows, and in a file if you have linux. –  Marichyasana May 10 '13 at 1:12
    
@user2228462 Then only put when it's clicked. –  Daniel Kaplan May 10 '13 at 1:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You should use Preferences for this. That explanation is a little complex. But basically it saves values that can be retrieved between runs.

Here's a tutorial of how to use this with a JFileChooser. Here's an example I wrote:

package com.sandbox;

import java.util.prefs.Preferences;

public class Sandbox {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Preferences prefs = Preferences.userNodeForPackage(Sandbox.class);
        Integer counter = Integer.valueOf(prefs.get("counter", "0"));
        System.out.println(counter);
        counter++;
        prefs.put("counter", String.valueOf(counter));
    }
}

The first time you run this, it'll print "0". The next time you run it, it'll print "1".

share|improve this answer
    
+1 never knew about Preferences –  Nicolás Carlo May 9 '13 at 22:55
    
+1 Use Integer.parseInt() instead of using Integer.valueOf() :) –  Eng.Fouad May 9 '13 at 23:10
    
+1 For Preferences, -1 for Integer.valueOf. Preferences has the ability to get/putInt (and all primitives) automatically, no need for parsing. Check out Preferences#getInt and Preferences#putInt –  MadProgrammer May 10 '13 at 0:15

Edit 2: I like the idea of using Preference. But, could you give me an examplre for me for one of the examples above? I'm kind of a beginner in Java, so I have a lot of questions. Like, does the code go in the actionPerformed of the button? And, how could I save different kinds of information(JTextarea foreground as red) with Preferences?

Do it like this:

private static Preferences prefs = Preferences.userNodeForPackage(className.class);
private JFrame frame;
private JTextArea textArea;

public void init()
{
    frame = new JFrame();
    textArea = new JTextArea();

    // ...

    String storedValue = prefs.get("textAreaColor", null);
    if(storedValue != null)
    {
        Color color = new Color(Integer.parseInt(storedValue));
        textArea.setForeground(color);
    }

    frame.addWindowListener(new WindowAdapter()
    {
        @Override
        public void windowClosed(WindowEvent e)
        {
            Color color = textArea.getForeground();
            int rgb = color.getRGB();
            prefs.put("textAreaColor", Integer.toString(rgb));
        }
    });

    // ...
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for Preferences; to minimize conversions, also consider getInt() and putInt(). –  trashgod May 10 '13 at 0:10

Save the settings to an external file. Then (try to) read that file when the program starts and apply the settings.

share|improve this answer
    
If you distribute your app as a jar, or an ear, this can be a pain. There's many points of failure, too (eg: you gotta make sure the file path is OS agnostic, what happens if the file doesn't exist? What if the path doesn't exist?) I think using a Preference is an easier way. –  Daniel Kaplan May 9 '13 at 22:50
    
Agreed, Preference does indeed look better. I simply didn't know about it and this was the first that came to mind. ;) –  Kninnug May 9 '13 at 22:52

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