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Example Python parent file:

class myClass( wx.Frame ):
    def __init__(self):
        print "Prepare execute"
        self.MyThread = Thread.RunBackground( './child.py' , ( '--username' , 'root' ) );
        print "Executing... Do you like this app?"
        self.MyThread.start();
    def onClose( self , evt ):
        self.MyThread.close()
        self.exit();

app = MyClass()

I need to know how to run a script in background with Python. The idea is that the main window can be used, even if the second process works.

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So... what's your question? What are you having trouble with? –  Henry Keiter May 9 '13 at 22:41
    
I need to know how to run a script in background with Python. The idea is that the main window can be used, even if the second process works. –  Olaf Erlandsen May 9 '13 at 22:44
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm going to take a guess here: You don't care about threads at all, you just want to "run a script" as a "second process".

That's easy. Running a script is just like running anything else; you use the subprocess module. Since the script is running inside an entirely separate Python interpreter instance, in an entirely separate process, "the main window can be used, even if the second process works"—or even if it just spins or blocks forever.

For example:

class myClass( wx.Frame ):
    def __init__(self):
        print "Executing... Do you like this app?"
        self.child = subprocess.Popen([sys.executable, './child.py', '--username', 'root'])
    def onClose( self , evt ):
        self.child.wait()
        self.exit();

The only trick here is what to pass as the first argument. If you want to make sure child.py is run by the same copy of Python as the parent, use sys.executable. If you want to make sure it's run by the default Python, even if the parent is using a different one, use python. If you want to use a specific one, use an absolute path. If you want to let the shell (or, on Windows, the pylauncher thing) figure it out based on the #! line, use shell=True and just pass ./child.py as the first argument. And so on.

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