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Is this possible or am I barking up the wrong tree here?

var data = 'one';
function fnc(){
    this.out = function(){
        return data;
    }
}
var instance = new fnc();

alert(instance.out);
data = 'two';
alert(instance.out);

// I know that this would achieve that, but that's not what I would like to know.

alert(instance.out());
data = 'two';
alert(instance.out());

Update:

The object which fnc is supposed to represent is actually a Sarissa dom document. Here is a more elaborate version of fnc(), dom_doc(). The accepted answer below has been integrated into the function below.

function get_doc(dom_node) {
    var doc;
    if (navigator.userAgent.indexOf("MSIE") >= 0) {
        doc = new ActiveXObject("Msxml2.DOMDocument.3.0");
        doc.loadXML(document.getElementById(dom_node).text);
    }
    else {
        doc = Sarissa.getDomDocument();
        doc = (new DOMParser()).parseFromString(document.getElementById(dom_node).textContent, "text/xml");
        // runs XSLTProcessor in modern browsers as if it was trasformNode
        doc.transformNode = function (stylesheet) {
            var processor = new XSLTProcessor();
            processor.importStylesheet(stylesheet);
            return new XMLSerializer().serializeToString(processor.transformToDocument(this));
        }

        // allows modern browsers to extract xml the way the legacy IEs did
        var getXML = {};
        getXML.toString = function(){
            return new XMLSerializer().serializeToString(doc);
        };
        doc.xml = getXML;
    }
    return doc;
}

Demo: JSFIDDLE

share|improve this question
1  
Yes, it is possible. It's called getters. –  Bergi May 9 '13 at 22:43
    
Not the best dupe, but I found Javascript getters and setters for dummies? –  Bergi May 9 '13 at 22:44
1  
@Serhiy Usually, questions closed as duplicates are kept as signposts for people coming to them via Google. –  bfavaretto May 9 '13 at 22:53
1  
@Serhiy Now that I'm seeing your actual code, why not just doc.xml = new XMLSerializer().serializeToString(doc);? –  bfavaretto May 10 '13 at 1:46
1  
@bfavaretto The xml is manipulated via setAttribute and such. This is what I had first tried and noticed that the changes are not reflected, only the original xml string is returned. –  Serhiy May 10 '13 at 2:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

jsFiddle Demo

These types of workarounds really bypass convention though. It should not be that much of a hamper to simply use () on your functions. Using () is expected, readable, best practice, and the industry standard.

Not sure why smartcaveman decided to remove his answer of using toString but that is a viable approach although somewhat hackish.

var data = 'one';
function fnc(){
 var getData = {};
 getData.toString = function(){
   return data;
 };
 this.out = getData;
}

var instance = new fnc();

alert(instance.out);//one
data = 'two';
alert(instance.out);//two

var s = instance.out;
alert(s);//two
share|improve this answer
    
I hope it wasn't my fault for going nope when his solution didn't work. This however is exactly what I need, and changed the answer to this one, as the other two methods didn't quite work within the context of the actual situation. –  Serhiy May 9 '13 at 23:17
    
smartcaveman's answer only works if what you are using is automatically calling toString() for you, like alert. It's not what the OP is asking –  Juan Mendes May 9 '13 at 23:19
    
@JuanMendes - Okay, thanks for the clarification. –  Travis J May 9 '13 at 23:19
    
I disagree that the standard is using a method. JavaScript always had property getter/setters, it's just we (JS developers) couldn't create our own. Simplest example is a setter like document.cookie="...", it doesn't just set a property, it calls a method under the hood. –  Juan Mendes May 9 '13 at 23:26
2  
@JuanMendes - I believe you are misrepresenting the "spirit" when you are making these statements. Please read this post on meta: meta.stackexchange.com/a/5235/178816 and make a post on meta with regards to your issue on the "spirit of SO" before you take on the full mantle of what stackoverflow is or isn't or begin dictating what the OP should or should not accept. Note the part which says: "The bottom line is that you should accept the answer that you found to be the most helpful to you, personally." –  Travis J May 9 '13 at 23:37

You seem to be talking about a getter method. If that's what you mean, you can use this:

var data = 'one';
function fnc(){
    Object.defineProperty(this, 'out', {
        get : function(){ return data; }
    });
}
var instance = new fnc();

alert(instance.out);

http://jsfiddle.net/zztYd/1

This is not compatible with older browsers (see the compatibility table at the bottom of this page).

Also, it's a little weird to use a getter to fetch a global variable. Usually you use that to get the value of a private variable on your instance object, and in that case you could only modify it with a corresponding setter.

share|improve this answer
    
Don't you want your defineProperty call within the constructor? –  Juan Mendes May 9 '13 at 22:45
2  
Why not put the property definition inside the constructor, just as the OP had it? –  Bergi May 9 '13 at 22:46
1  
@Serhiy There's also the literal syntax fnc.prototype = { get x() function(){return data}} jsfiddle.net/mendesjuan/zztYd/2 –  Juan Mendes May 9 '13 at 22:47
1  
@bfavaretto developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/Operators/… says it's in ECMAScript5 and Supported by IE9+/Firefox1.8.1+/Chrome/Opera9.5+/Safari3+ –  Juan Mendes May 9 '13 at 22:54
1  
@bfavaretto Look at page 65 ecma-international.org/publications/files/ECMA-ST/Ecma-262.pdf –  Juan Mendes May 9 '13 at 23:01

The alternative to bfavaretto's solution is to use the literal syntax for an object. Has almost the same level of support as Object.defineProperty().

Also, you should call Object.defineProperty only once, not with every instantiation.

I'm also going to provide a more realistic example, that is, the property gets calculated, instead of just referencing a global.

http://jsfiddle.net/mendesjuan/zztYd/3/

function Pair(a,b){
    this.a = a;
    this.b = b;
}

Pair.prototype = {
    get sum(){ 
        return this.a + this.b; 
    }
};

var pair = new Pair(1,2);
alert(pair.sum);
pair.a = 5;
alert(pair.sum);

The benefit of this is that you can change the implementation to be storage instead of calculation and you won't have to change how it's called.

function Pair(a,b){
    this.a = a;
    this.b = b;
    this.sum = a + b;
}

Pair.prototype = {
    setA: function(a){ 
        this.a  = a;
        this.sum = this.a + this.b; 
    }
};

var pair = new Pair(1,2);
alert(pair.sum);
pair.setA(5);
alert(pair.sum);

Notice that you do have to now call setA so that sum can be recalculated. Or you could use a setter.

function Pair(a,b){
    this.a = a;
    this.b = b;
    this.sum = a + b;
}

Pair.prototype = {
    set a(a) {
        this.a  = a;
        this.sum = this.a + this.b; 
    }
};

var pair = new Pair(1,2);
alert(pair.sum);
pair.a = 5;
alert(pair.sum);
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for an actually useful example of a getter - and for that comment with the page number on the ecma spec :) Just one thing: this syntax is clearly simpler, but Object.defineProperty doesn't necessarily have to be called with every instantiation; it could be used on the constructor's prototype just like you did here. –  bfavaretto May 10 '13 at 2:00
1  
@bfavaretto Fixed the text so it doesn't imply that Object.defineProperty doesn't necessarily have to be called with every instantiation –  Juan Mendes May 10 '13 at 13:28

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