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the structure of the problem is such Food is an abstract base class; Plant, and Animal directly inherit from that. Herbivore, Carnivore, and Omnivore inherit from Animal, while Fruits and Nuts and Leaves inherit from Plant Lemur, Koala, and Squirrel inherit from Herbivore

overall it's a hot mess, but it's necessary for the exercise. the entire project is available on GitHub https://github.com/joekitch/OOP_JK_Assignment_4/blob/master/OOP_JK_Assignment_4/Lemur.h the full class diagram is in also on the GitHub

but here are the relevant bits and bobs (at least, the ones i believe are relevant) first up is the food class, which contains almost nothing

#pragma once
#include <string>
#include <list>
using namespace std;

class Food
{
public:

    Food(){ }
    virtual ~Food(){ }


};

next is Animal, which contains the virtuals of the hunt() and eat() functions

#pragma once
#include "Food.h"
#include "Animal.h"
#include "Plant.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <list>
using namespace std;

class Animal : public Food
{
public:
    Animal(void) : name(), alive(true), age(0), calories(0), weight(0) { }
        Animal(string& animal_name, int animal_age, int animal_calories, double animal_weight) : 
        name(animal_name), alive(true), age(animal_age), calories(animal_calories), weight(animal_weight), maxcalories(animal_calories) {}

    virtual ~Animal(){}

    virtual bool eat(Food* food){return false;};
    virtual bool hunt(list<Food*> &foodlist){return false;};


    virtual void PrintSelf(){};

    virtual string& getName(){
        return name;
    };


        std::string name;
        bool alive;
        int age, calories, maxcalories;
        double weight;
};

This is Herbivore, which fully defines the hunt() function, this is where the problems start (see my comment within hunt() ). hunt takes in a list of type Food* which is declared globally within main()

#pragma once
#include "Animal.h"
//#include "Lemur.h"
#include "Plant.h"
#include "Fruit.h"
#include "Leaf.h"
#include "Nut.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <list>
#include <typeinfo>
using namespace std;

class Herbivore : public virtual Animal
    {
    public:
        Herbivore() {}
        virtual ~Herbivore(){}
        virtual bool eat(Food* food) {cout << "herbivore.h eat() called" << endl; return true;};



        bool hunt(list<Food*> &foodlist) //herbivore version of hunt()
        {
            int fruitcounter=0;
            int plantcounter=0;
            string name;
            for (list<Food*>::iterator it = foodlist.begin(); it != foodlist.end(); it++)
            {
                if (Plant* temp = dynamic_cast<Plant*>(*it))
                {
//this is there the problems start. the above dynamic cast SHOULD make temp 
//non-null if the thing i'm looking at is a child of plant (that is, if the thing 
//in the food list is a fruit or a nut or a leaf). And indeed it does...but the 
//next dynamic cast (in the eat() function of Lemur) doesn't detect any fruits....

                    plantcounter++;

                    if ( eat(*it) )
                    fruitcounter++;
                    //return true;
                }

            }
            cout << "there are " << fruitcounter << " fruits and " << plantcounter << " plants in the list." << endl;
            return false;
        };


};

and here is the Fruit class. nothing particularly notable, i'm just placing it here just in case they helps solve the problem

#pragma once
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include "Plant.h"
using namespace std;

class Fruit : public Plant {
    public:
        Fruit (std::string& plant_name, int energy_value):
          Plant (plant_name, energy_value){} //constructor pased to base class

        ~Fruit(){ } //destructor

        //inherits basically everything from the Plant base class, makes leae nodes in the class tree easy to write and access



    };

now HERE'S the REAL troublemaker. this Lemur fully defines the eat() function, and takes a Food* that it was passed to it from hunt(), called from herbivore, and does more tests on it to see if it's a fruit (which is the only Plant the lemur can eat)

#pragma once
#include "Animal.h"
#include "Herbivore.h"
#include "Plant.h"
#include "Fruit.h"
#include "Leaf.h"
#include "Nut.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <list>
#include <typeinfo>
using namespace std;

class Lemur : public Herbivore
{
    public:
        Lemur(void) : name(), alive(true), age(0), calories(0), weight(0) {}
        Lemur(string& animal_name, int animal_age, int animal_calories, double animal_weight) : 
        name(animal_name), alive(true), age(animal_age), calories(animal_calories), weight(animal_weight), maxcalories(animal_calories) {}


        ~Lemur(){}



        bool eat(Food* food)
        {




            if (Fruit* temp = dynamic_cast<Fruit*>(food))
            {
                //PROBLEM, it sees every plant as a fruit in this
//case...at least according to a typeinfo().name() that i have run in here. However the temp
//always returns null, so this proper if statement never actually happens, so it never sees
//any fruit, even though there's a whole bunch in the list (500 of them). what's wrong?
                cout << "it's a fruit" << endl;
                return true;
            }
            else
            {
                //cout << "not a fruit" << endl;
                return false;
            }


        }


    void PrintSelf()
    {
        cout << "i am a " << age << " year old, " << weight << " kilogram " << name << " with " << calories << " calories." << endl;
    };

    string& getName(){
        return name;
    };

        std::string name;
        bool alive;
        int age, calories, maxcalories;
        double weight;


};

as you can see, the dynamic_cast never returns a non null temp, even though i have confirmed that it traverses the list. i also use counter variables to track its progress and the strange thing is that it says there are 1500 plants in the list...but 0 fruits...

am i structuring my casts wrong? is my inheritance off? what do?

edit; i added virtual destructors for every class, so that isn't the problem

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1 Answer 1

from looking at the github repo, it looks like the problem is in main.cpp where you add the object to the Food_list:

else if (FileIn_type == Plant_type)
{
    Plants++;
    FileIn >> FileIn_name >> FileIn_calories;
    Food_list.push_back(new Plant (FileIn_name, FileIn_calories) );
}

You only ever create a Plant object to add to the list. So that's what the dynamic type of all those objects will be.

Just above that bit of code in main.cpp, you have a cascade of if/else statements that create different animal types baed on the animal name string. You need to do something similar for plants.

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ah hah! that must be it. and it would make sense too, there's nothing below Plants so the cast would always fail since there isn't anything below plants in the first place –  user2364502 May 10 '13 at 10:58
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