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I wrote a rational class for my college homework.

class Rational
{
    friend std::istream &operator >>(std::istream &, const Rational &);
    friend std::ostream &operator <<(std::ostream &, const Rational &);
public:
    ...
private:
    int numerator;
    int denominator;
}

istream &operator >>(istream &istm, const Rational &num){
    istm>>num.numerator>>num.denominator;
    return istm;
}

however >> overloading function seems to loop infinitely. then core dump...

I quickly found that I've added "const" to Ratoinal &num by accident.

my question is why

istm>>num.numerator>>num.denominator;

compile successfully but become an infinite loop?

and please explain the following result... thanks

const int i;
cin>>i;  //compile error

int c;
const int &a=c;
cin>>a;  //pass
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closed as too localized by Tony D, sashoalm, flavian, Anand, Joe Gauterin May 10 '13 at 12:56

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Are you sure it's an infinite loop? Or is it just pausing at the terminal waiting for input for the istream? –  Yuushi May 10 '13 at 5:26
    
For your second question, you can try and remove your operator>> overload, and consult john's answer for more insight. –  Nbr44 May 10 '13 at 5:39
    
Sorry Tim, but what you describe just isn't possible with the code shown. Please try to write and post some code that reproduces the problem. You'll see both the above scenarios produce compilation errors. Perhaps your "symptoms" are from other causes, such as running an out-of-date binary with some other bug after you mistook a failed compilation attempt for a successful one etc.... Anyway, I'm recommending to close this as "not a real question".... –  Tony D May 10 '13 at 5:58
    
Complete code is here with makefile:) 140.116.5.200/~f74012138/hw2.zip –  Tim Hsu May 10 '13 at 7:04
    
@TimHsu: as john deduced, the class in your real code does have a non-explicit constructor from int - lost in the "..." above. His analysis is spot on... no operator>>(istream&, const int&) (which is what num.numerator & ~denominator are when const Rational& is used, so the compiler does one Standard Conversion using Rational(int) to get a non-const object for which there is a matching operator>> - the running one :-(. +1 for him. –  Tony D May 10 '13 at 8:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You haven't shown all of your class but I would guess that the following is happening

class Rational
{
    friend std::istream& operator>>(std::istream&, const Rational&);
    friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream&, const Rational&);
public:
    Rational(int num);
    ...
private:
    int numerator;
    int denominator;
};

istream& operator>>(istream& istm, const Rational& num)
{
    istm >> Rational(num.numerator) >> Rational(num.denominator);
    return istm;
}

Assuming your Rational class has a one-arg constructor taking an int, then your version of operator>>, that wrongly takes a const argument, will implicitly create Rational objects from the numerator and denominator. The results in an infinite loop. I've added the Rational constructor calls to the operator>> above to make it clear what's happening.

This example shows the dangers in having automatic conversion between types when you have a one-arg constructor. You can disable this by using the keyword explicit.

    explicit Rational(int num);

but I guess in this case you might want the automatic conversion from int to Rational most of the time.

share|improve this answer
    
And this actually answers his second question as well :) –  Nbr44 May 10 '13 at 5:38
    
I think this is the correct answer. but I don't want Rational(int) to be explicit. I need statement like this to work: "cout<<(1/Rational(1,3));", which produce 3 –  Tim Hsu May 10 '13 at 7:07
    
@Nbr44 he really answer my second question too? but ..I don't see any overloaded function that takes const int & as argument cplusplus.com/reference/istream/istream/operator%3E%3E –  Tim Hsu May 10 '13 at 7:13
    
@Tim Hsu the reason was exactly the same. Since cin cannot write to a const int &, it was looking for the closest equivalent - meaning, your Rational class, which is likely to have a non-explicit constructor taking an int as its parameter. And, in that situation, it would call your overload. –  Nbr44 May 10 '13 at 8:34
    
Thanks I got it:) really good answer –  Tim Hsu May 10 '13 at 15:47

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