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I'm trying to inderstand what I'm doing wrong here, but it realy doesn't make sense to me. I have a class calleld LatLongBean Here I'm trying to parse an XML feed.

I have a method where I do all the logic. and I have some getters and setters.

It seems like the setter is working, but the getters are not working.

This is the LatLongBean:

public class LatLongBean {

    private String lat;
    private String lng;
    private String address;
    private String url = "http://maps.googleapis.com/maps/api/geocode/xml?address=";

    public void LatLongBean(String address, String lat, String lng) throws ParserConfigurationException, SAXException, IOException {
        this.address = address;
        this.lat = lat;
        this.lng = lng;

        DocumentBuilderFactory dbFactory = DocumentBuilderFactory.newInstance();
        DocumentBuilder dBuilder = dbFactory.newDocumentBuilder();
        Document doc = dBuilder.parse(new URL(url + address + "&sensor=false").openStream());
        doc.getDocumentElement().normalize();

        NodeList nodes = doc.getElementsByTagName("location");

        for (int i = 0; i < nodes.getLength(); i++) {
            Node node = nodes.item(i);

            if (node.getNodeType() == Node.ELEMENT_NODE) {
                Element element = (Element) node;
                lat = getValue("lat", element);
                lng = getValue("lng", element);
            }
        }
    }

    private static String getValue(String tag, Element element) {
        NodeList nodes = element.getElementsByTagName(tag).item(0).getChildNodes();
        Node node = (Node) nodes.item(0);
        return node.getNodeValue();
    }

    public String getLat() {
        System.out.println(lat);
        return lat;
    }

    public String getLng() {
        System.out.println(lng);
        return lng;
    }

    public void setAddress(String address) {
        this.address = address;
    }
}

and this is what I do to use this class:

LatLongBean latLong1 = new LatLongBean();
latLong1.setAddress("Amsterdam");
latLong1.getLat();
latLong1.getLng();

The getters are returning null!

When I make the LatLongBean method not void and use is as a constructor it works like a charm:

LatLongBean latLong1 = new LatLongBean("Amsterdam");
latLong1.getLat();
latLong1.getLng();

Could someone please help me?

Thanx in advance!

share|improve this question
    
The code you've posted won't even compile, because you're calling new LatLongBean() without passing an address, and you haven't declared such a constructor. EDIT: Aargh - I hadn't spotted that it's not actually a constructor. Ick! – Jon Skeet May 10 '13 at 5:37
    
It's entirely possible lat and lng aren't ever being initialized. If node.getNodeType() == Node.ELEMENT_NODE isn't true for any node, then neither of them will ever be initialized. – Yuushi May 10 '13 at 5:39
    
Indeed. The Java Default Constructor is only generated if you have not specified any other constructor, or, evidently, have included it in your class definition. At this point I doubt that your Getter is the problem seeing the code, but the retrieving of the value. An important note, the code does not do what you want it to do. If there are multiple Amsterdams, as by your example, only the location of the last Amsterdam in the list of results will be available to you. As that is seldom the more popular city, your code may not behave as expected! – Eric May 10 '13 at 5:46
    
Thanx for the warnings, but I'm not having trouble finding the correct Amsterdam, It only returns 1 lat and 1 long. The problem I'm having occurs even when using a small village name. – kawa May 10 '13 at 6:08

You are not invoking public void LatLongBean(String address, String lat, String lng) method, which does the parsing and setting the value job.

Yeah this is a method. If you wanted above to be a constructor, you should remove, the return type void from it. like below

public LatLongBean(String address, String lat, String lng) {
     // your constructor logic
} 

and invoke it like

LatLongBean latLong1 = new LatLongBean("http://youraddress.com/xml","a","b");
latLong1.setAddress("Amsterdam");
latLong1.getLat();
latLong1.getLng();

EDIT: also in your supposed to be constructor code change the below line like this

       if (node.getNodeType() == Node.ELEMENT_NODE) {
            Element element = (Element) node;
            this.lat = getValue("lat", element); // not using this will not write the Document read value to the class variable lat and lng, instead it writes to the parameter itself
            this.lng = getValue("lng", element);
        }
share|improve this answer
    
Well spotted. That's horrible. – Jon Skeet May 10 '13 at 5:41
    
if I do it like that, the getters are returning 'a' and 'b'. – kawa May 10 '13 at 5:47
    
No, you are overwriting the parameters without using them in your code. Also, you need to make sure you use the coordiantes in your code. Right now, you are getting all locations mapping to the string you provide as first input parameter and only assign the last one's location, as you are iterating through the result list, to your variables. – Eric May 10 '13 at 5:50
2  
@kawa please see my new edit, you should be using this.lat while reading document's value – sanbhat May 10 '13 at 5:51
    
I realy appriciate the help! After inserting this in front of the variables I get a result, but not the result for the setter. When I use it like this: LatLongBean latLong1 = new LatLongBean("a","b","c"); latLong1.setAddress("Amsterdam"); I get the results for "a" – kawa May 10 '13 at 6:00

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