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I'm doing the below for displaying a news item with image. It works fine for 320 width devices, but what can we do for 240 devices as am floating the image to the right, it goes down, also is it wise to use % with div (instead of tables)

<div style="padding:10px;height: 100px;border-bottom: red 1px dashed">
  <div style="width: 56%; float: left; padding-right: 10px;">
     <span style="font-size: 14px; display: block; color: #cccccc">
        Pune, the team to beat
      </span> 
      <span style="font-size: 16px"> 
         Ruthless Gayle
      </span>
  </div>
  <div style="width: 40%; float: right">
    <img src="../images/src.jpg" width="120px" height="80px" />
  </div>
</div>

Please let know how to do this better. Should we reduce fonts for small width devices. And, wat about image size also.

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5 Answers 5

for font-size use "em" instead "px" --> 1em = 16px.

and body-->font-size :100%;

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what is the difference here. Only the unit varies "em" or "px". Does the device recognize it differently. –  user694688 May 10 '13 at 12:29

define a css like

.text{
    text-overflow: ellipsis;
     font-size: 1em;
}
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Try with padding right in % :

e.g.

<div style="width: 56%; float: left; padding-right: 2%;">
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Thanks. One doubt is that we have a heading and sub-heading in the above html. I have used span. What is the correct html tag to use for all these. Don't want to override heading tags as it will affect across the site. –  user694688 May 10 '13 at 12:47

When it comes to designing for mobile/smartphones, the wise move is to use % or em in setting the sizes, margins, and paddings.

<div style="padding:5%;height: 40%;border-bottom: red 1px dashed">
  <div style="width: 56%; float: left; padding-right: 5%;">
    <span style="font-size: 2em; display: block; color: #cccccc">
      Pune, the team to beat
    </span> 
    <span style="font-size: 2em"> 
      Ruthless Gayle
    </span>
</div>
<div style="width: 40%; float: right">
  <img src="../images/src.jpg" width="100%" height="100%" />
</div>

Of course the values I inserted are just temporary. Just test and test until you get the right results. I left the border in px but you can change that as well. But it is just a border so I think it will not be big deal.

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Thanks, But have few specific questions: 1. How does em help? What difference it makes. According to my understanding, it is just a different way of specifying size. 2. If I float the above divs and resize the browser the image goes down. But, this does not happen when we use a table? So, are tables better for layouting. 3. How to set the size of an image. Should it be an absolute pixel size. Basically, want to know how it will fit in according to the div percentage and how it will get displayed on various devices –  user694688 May 10 '13 at 12:41
    
em will adjust the size depending on the screen size being used. it is similar to %, which is dependent on the screen size. using px will result to stubborn sizing in mobile/smartphone since the browser will obey the fixed size you declare in px regardless of the screen size being used. –  kireirina May 13 '13 at 5:16
    
@user694688, about the table question, i am not really sure about this. but when designing for mobile, you need to consider not putting too much weight as it will affect the speed of website loading. just google if tables are heavy since i am not sure about this. –  kireirina May 13 '13 at 5:22
    
@user694688, to know how your image will look like in different devices, try installing FireMobileSimulator on your browser. it will help give you an idea on how your webpage will look like in different mobile models. best of luck! –  kireirina May 13 '13 at 5:24

While some here gave you an answer they didn't explain what was happening. Basically everything comes to math.

If you have a screen width 240 px width, when you calculate 96% of it (56% left and 40% right) you will get rounded 231 px. That leaves us with 9 spare pixels. Which are unfortunately not enough because on a left item you have a padding-right: 10px;. That same padding is adding its own value to full width sum. So to accommodate this structure you will need to have width of minimally 241 px.

That is why you should also use some percentage value for your padding.

<div style="padding:10px;height: 100px;border-bottom: red 1px dashed">
  <div style="width: 56%; float: left; padding-right: 4%;">
     <span style="font-size: 14px; display: block; color: #cccccc">
        Pune, the team to beat
      </span> 
      <span style="font-size: 16px"> 
         Ruthless Gayle
      </span>
  </div>
  <div style="width: 40%; float: right">
    <img src="../images/src.jpg" width="120px" height="80px" />
  </div>
</div>

What you have here is a correct measurement. 56 % (left )+ 4 % (padding) + 40 % (right) = 100 %;

Regarding your questions from one of your comments:

  1. You have correctly used span here, unlike div, span is inline element so it should be used like that, or in your case as a part of a heading or sub heading.

  2. Tables are thing of a past, table should be used only to display a tabular data and it should not be used for complex layout design. It is a big no no. You original way was a correct modern way, you just need to take care of math, when using percentages always use percentages and vice versa.

  3. Px vs em is an old war. Ok not that much a war because em should be used when working on a web development of pages used for desktop and mobile devices. Unlike px, em will scale with screen size and screen density. For example text shown in px when looked on y modern mobile devices will look small but em will scale in size and you will not need to zoom / unzoom your page to have a better readability.

  4. Image should always have a parent container, for example div. Then it should have width set to 100 % and height set to auto. Because of this it will stretch in width and height auto will stretch it vertically so that its aspect ration (width / height) can stay the same.

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