Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a reference to class object that pointed to some class, say, XYZ as follow:

public class XYZ
{
     int x;
     int y;
     int z;
    XYZ()
    {
      x=0;
      y=1;
      z=2;
    }
};


object ObjRef;
ObjRef = new XYZ();

Now, I want to access member variable x, y and z through ObjRef. How can I achieve this?

Thanks in advance.

EDIT :

The class XYZ is inside client's DLL. I have loaded this class using

Assembly MyAssembly = Assembly.LoadFrom(AssemblyName)

Type XYZType = MyAssembly.GetType("XYZ");
Object ObjectRef = Activator.CreateInstance(XYZType);

So i don't have direct access to XYZ. I have Object reference that pointed to XYZ.

share|improve this question
    
I believe you'd have to cast ObjRef to XYZ to access the members. –  Tim May 10 '13 at 8:28
    
I'm a little confused - if you've loaded the class, why can you not instantiate the class, even if it's from a third party DLL? –  Tim May 10 '13 at 8:35
    
Tim, because the project that contains Assembly.LoadFrom has no reference to the client DLL. Any types defined in it will not be available at compile-time. –  Umar Farooq Khawaja May 10 '13 at 8:48
add comment

8 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your classes using private variables. You should use the reflection to access private property as well private variables when you must create instance via outside assembly which you cannot access directly.

You can use reflector with BindingFlags.NonPublic and BindingFlags.Instance flags

FieldInfo[] fields = typeof(XYZ).GetFields(
                         BindingFlags.NonPublic | 
                         BindingFlags.Instance);

And access into private member following code statement below:

object objRef = new XYZ();
int x = (int)fields.Single(f => f.Name.Equals("x")).GetValue(objRef);
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. that was helpful –  someone_ smiley May 13 '13 at 3:33
add comment

Either use casting like other people have mentioned or if you don't know what to cast to at runtime, then use the System.Type.GetField method and use BindingFlags.NonPublic.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thank you. that was helpful –  someone_ smiley May 13 '13 at 3:33
add comment

By casting it from object back to XYZ:

XYZ a = (XYZ) ObjRef;
int result = a.x;

That will cause an exception if ObjRef isn't an XYZ. You can also say:

XYZ a = ObjRef as XYZ;

which will return null if ObjRef isn't an XYZ.

share|improve this answer
    
I can't do that. class XYZ is in client's dll. I have load this dll using Assembly.LoadFrom(AssemblyName). so i have only objec reference to this instance. So i cant type cast by using (XYZ) –  someone_ smiley May 10 '13 at 8:32
    
@someone_smiley: You really need to explain that in your question. –  RichieHindle May 10 '13 at 8:33
    
I have edited my question. Sorry for inconveniences –  someone_ smiley May 10 '13 at 8:36
add comment

For reading the x-value:
((XYZ)ObjRef).x

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you do not have access to the original type, but you do happen to know both the names AND the types of the fields that you want to access, then you can use reflection as the following program demonstrates:

(Note: This assumes that the field is private as per your original post. If it is public, change BindingFlags.NonPublic to BindingFlags.Public)

using System;
using System.Reflection;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main()
        {
            new Program().Run();
        }

        void Run()
        {
            object obj = new XYZ();

            var xField = obj.GetType().GetField("x", BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance);

            int xValue = (int) xField.GetValue(obj);
            Console.WriteLine(xValue); // Prints 0

            xField.SetValue(obj, 42);  // Set private field value to 42
            xValue = (int)xField.GetValue(obj);
            Console.WriteLine(xValue); // Prints 42
        }
    }

    public class XYZ
    {
        int x;
        int y;
        int z;

        public XYZ()
        {
            x=0;
            y=1;
            z=2;
        }
    };
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Just add public keyword to variable declaration. So it will be like this:

public int x;
share|improve this answer
6  
public fields make hulk angry –  Marc Gravell May 10 '13 at 8:29
    
I can't do that. class XYZ is in client's dll. I have load this dll using Assembly.LoadFrom(AssemblyName). so i have only objec reference to this instance –  someone_ smiley May 10 '13 at 8:29
    
So object has a public variable named 'x'? –  Tim May 10 '13 at 8:29
    
No. class XYZ has public x –  someone_ smiley May 10 '13 at 8:31
    
You misunderstood my comment (or I misunderstood what you're trying to do). ObjRef is of type System.Object. I'm pretty sure that there is not a public x member in System.Object. –  Tim May 10 '13 at 8:33
show 3 more comments

I would advise to use public properties to access those variables instead of making it public. Although it may look quite overkill in some case, this is, I think, a best practice. I also think in most recent versions of .NET framework (I'm still using 2.0...) it ca be performed quite simply with less code as soon as you have simple getter and setter.

I think this link can help

share|improve this answer
1  
Automatically implemented properties are part of the language, not part of the framework - so you can use them when targeting .NET 2, so long as you're using a C# 3+ compiler. But I don't believe the question was really about that anyway... –  Jon Skeet May 10 '13 at 8:35
    
Yeah now with the update of the question I realize my answer doesn't help at all. Thanks for the info about automatically implemented properties though, I will look back into it ! –  Bartdude May 10 '13 at 8:38
add comment

I think what you should really do is that you should define an interface in a separate DLL that is then referenced by your code as well as the client DLL. Class XYZ should implement that interface and you should utilize that interface to access X, Y & Z, as follows:

// this is in the DLL defining the interface
public interface IXyz
{
    int X { get; }

    int Y { get; }

    int Z { get; }
}

// this would be in the client DLL that you dynamically load in your code
public class Xyz : IXyz
{
    public int X { get; set; }

    public int Y { get; set; }

    public int Z { get; set; }
}

And then finally,

// this is your code where you create XYZ
IXyz xyz = new Xyz();

int x = xyz.X;
share|improve this answer
    
This is of course assuming if you have any control over the client DLL. If you do not, I suppose you could always create a wrapper class and enclose the reflection logic in there. –  Umar Farooq Khawaja May 10 '13 at 8:45
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.