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So I have 3 classes:

  • Item
  • GroupItem extends Item
  • ProductItem extends Item

I am passing a array of Item objects to a class and want to do separate things depending on their class type.

Would using instanceof be an acceptable way of doing this or should I have an internal boolean isGroup() method which will be set on initialisation of the specified sub-class.

 class Item {
      protected boolean isGroup = false;
      public boolean isGroupItem() { return isGroup; }
 }

 class GroupItem extends Item {
      public GroupItem() {
           isGroup = true;
      }
 }

 class ProductItem extends Item {
      public ProductItem() {
           isGroup = false;
      }
 }


 class Promotion {
      // Item can be either a group or a list of items
      private List<Item> items = new LinkedList<Item>;
      public void addItem(Item itemObj) {
           items.addItem(itemObj);
      }
      public List<Item> getItems() {
           return items;
      }
 }



 class Checker {
      // Items retrieved from Promotion and passed from another class as array
      public Checker(Item[] items) {
           // either

           if(items[0] instanceof GroupItem) {
                // Do something ...
           }

           // or

           if(items[0].isGroupItem()) {
                // Do something ...
           } 
      }
 }

So my questions are:

  • instanceof or method?
  • if method, in Item or Promotion?
  • and, Why? (Just so i can better understand the reasoning)

Thanks in advance

share|improve this question
    
using instance of is more generic and readable. –  ay89 May 10 '13 at 8:52
    
Thanks fir the replies and answers. Just a bit more information for those answering: The stuff being done is that if it is a group it needs to be added to a different field in a database table –  Skepi May 10 '13 at 9:06

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is the exact place where you should use instanceOf operator .

The instanceof operator compares an object to a specified type. You can use it to test if an object is an instance of a class, an instance of a subclass, or an instance of a class that implements a particular interface.

There is no point to skatch a new method or some boolean property to do this stuff. You can easily identify specific Object of GroupItem by check instanceOf.

you can also use GroupItem.class.isInstance(items[0]) to check the same. like -

if(GroupItem.class.isInstance(items[0])) {
      // Do something ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for being first to suggest instanceof –  sᴜʀᴇsʜ ᴀᴛᴛᴀ May 10 '13 at 8:59

Use different methods on the actual type you want to pass as parameter.

Usually, using instance of means that there is something wrong in your model.

If you need to have different behaviors for different subtypes, it means that you are not really using the parent type. In addition, you are compelled to know the implementation details, which should not be the case.

If the inheritance you have is only a technical one, try to use composition instead of inheritance.

share|improve this answer

I guess I would try to define why I need to know if it is a group at this point.

Let's say it is to decide if one Item is eligible for a promotion and the promotion rules might change: then I would use instanceof, because you don't want the promotion rules logic to "pollute" your basic objects.

If being a group is an important property of your item and is useful in various contexts (not just the promotion rules), I would include it at the Item level.

share|improve this answer
    
It's because if the Item is a group item it needs to be added to certain fields, if it is not then it goes to other fields in a db –  Skepi May 10 '13 at 9:10

The instaceOf operator is a better choice but I would also consider to use the Visitor pattern.

interface Item{
   void accept(CheckerVisitor checker); 

}

class GroupItem implements Item{

    void accept(CheckerVisitor checker){
        checker.visit(this);
    }

}


class OtherItem implements Item{

    void accept(CheckerVisitor checker){
        checker.visit(this);
    }

}

class CheckerVisitor{

    void visit(GroupItem groupItem){
        //do specific things to GroupItem
    }

    void visit(OtherItem otherItem){}
}

class MyClassOfItems{
    List<Item> items = ...;
    for(Item item : items){
        item.accept(new CheckerVisitor());
    }
}
share|improve this answer

So after reading this i chose a different path for my solution. Thanks for everyone who helped.

The solution I chose allows me to not even be bothered with what sub-type the object is (thanks to Assylias and Balázs Mária Németh for making me rethink my structure) as I use abstract classes to just get the information i need.

 abstract class Item {
      public Item(...) {
           initialise();
           createSQLSegment();
      }

      protected String SQLSegment = "";
      protected abstract void createSQLSegment();
      public String getSQLSegment() {
           return SQLSegment;
      }

      ...
 }

 // Concrete class creates response
 class GroupItem extends Item {
      ...
      // Concrete method
      protected void createSQLStatement() {
           SQLStatement = "...SQL...";
      }
 }

 class ProductItem extends Item {
      ...
      // Concrete method
      protected void createSQLSegment() {
           SQLSegment = "...SQL..."
      }
 }


 class Promotion {
      // Item can be either a group or a list of items? extends Item>;
      public void addItem(Item itemObj) {
           items.addItem(itemObj);
      }
      public List<Item> getItems() {
           return items;
      }
 }



 class Checker {
      // Items retrieved from Promotion and passed from another class as array
      public Checker(Item[] items) {
           ...

           for(Item item : Items) {
                addPreparedSQLToBatch(item);
           }
      }

      private void addPreparedItemToBatch(Item item) {
           ...

           // No need to know concrete class
           SQLString += Item.getSQLSegment();

           ...
      }
 }

Thanks again to everyone.

Comments welcome, I'm always learning :-)

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