Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Below is the shell script I am trying to find the meaning.

sed 's/19984 $/98400 /' | sed 's/19992 $/99200 /'

I expect 19984 $ will get replaced with 98400 and this string will be passed to next sed command which replace 19992 $ with 99200 .

But when I executed the script below with sample input

echo "19984 $ need to be  replaced with 98400  "| sed 's/19984 $/98400 /' | sed 's/19992 $/99200 /'

I get the same string

"19984 $ need to be  replaced with 98400"

I hope something I am missing here. Please help me. I am new to shell scripts. Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For sed, $ is a reserved character to you have to escape it (\$) to be parsed properly:

$ echo "19984 $ need to be  replaced with 98400  "| sed 's/19984 \$/98400 /' 
98400  need to be  replaced with 98400

All together:

$ echo "19984 $ need to be  replaced with 98400  "| sed 's/19984 \$/98400 /' | sed 's/19992 \$/99200 /'
98400  need to be  replaced with 98400

So you need to keep it like it is.

$ can mean a lot of things:
- a normal character.
- end of line.
- name of a variable.

The way you got the code it means the second case: end of line:

$ echo "19984 " | sed 's/19984 $/98400 /'
98400
$ echo "19984 something" | sed 's/19984 $/98400 /'
19984 something

so sed will match just the cases in which the line ends with 19984. Otherwise it won't match.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok that is nice. But I am studying an old code in which they kept the code as it is. Then what would have they meant –  Kiren Siva May 10 '13 at 9:38
    
Just updated my answer. Your original code means end of line, I hope the examples help to understand it. –  fedorqui May 10 '13 at 9:44
1  
That's what I am looking for! Thank you very much Mr Fedorqui –  Kiren Siva May 10 '13 at 9:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.