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I am trying to construct a query of the following nature: If x is in the union of A and B, but not in the union of C and D, return x.

For example:

table    table    table    table
+---+    +---+    +---+    +---+
| A |    | B |    | C |    | D |
+---+    +---+    +---+    +---+
| 1 |    | 4 |    | 2 |    | 3 |
| 2 |    | 5 |    | 3 |    | 7 |
| 3 |    | 6 |    +---+    +---+
| 4 |    | 7 |
+---+    +---+

I would be looking for this to return:

+---+
| E |
+---+
| 1 |
| 4 |
| 5 |
| 6 |
+---+

I've tried:

SELECT * from A
union
SELECT * from B
WHERE * not in
(SELECT * from C
union
SELECT * from D)

but I think my syntax is incorrect. Any advice on how to solve this would be hugely appreciated.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would write your query this way:

SELECT *
FROM A
WHERE A.ID NOT IN (SELECT ID FROM C)
      AND A.ID NOT IN (SELECT ID FROM D)
UNION
SELECT *
FROM B
WHERE B.ID NOT IN (SELECT ID FROM C)
      AND B.ID NOT IN (SELECT ID FROM D)

You can also write it like this:

SELECT *
FROM
  (SELECT * FROM A UNION SELECT * FROM B) s
WHERE
  ID NOT IN (SELECT ID FROM C UNION SELECT ID FROM D)

Please see fiddle here. You might want to use UNION ALL instead of UNION to remove duplicates.

share|improve this answer
    
That did the trick. Thank you! – Adam_G May 10 '13 at 10:49

Try this:

SELECT u1.col1
FROM (SELECT col1 from A union SELECT col1 from B) u1
LEFT OUTER JOIN (SELECT col1 from C union SELECT col1 from D) u2
ON u1.col1 = u2.col1
WHERE u2.col1 IS NULL

See the demo on SQLFiddle.

The query does a left outer join of the two union results and then filters out of ones which are missing in one of the union result.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Aziz. I'm sure this would've done the trick, but the other answer was easier for me to understand. – Adam_G May 10 '13 at 10:50

The 'union' command is a query separator. This means that what comes before it is a query, and what comes after it is another query. As a result, your WHERE clause will only apply to the second query (SELECT * from B).

Depending on your SQL platform, you may be able to copy the WHERE clause to before the UNION so it applies to both queries. Alternatively, you may need to use JOIN or EXCEPTION JOIN, or EXISTS, in order to get what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for te info. – Adam_G May 10 '13 at 10:50

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