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I need to implement a new, or already existing, encryption algorithm that encrypt and decrypt a string using another string as key. The problem is that this algorithm have to work independently from a computer on which it is used.

So the methods signature are:

public static string Encrypt(this string source, string key);

public static string Decrypt(this string source, string key);

I tried these algorithms, but they don't work the way I want:

public static string Encrypt(this string source, string key)
{
    if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(source) || String.IsNullOrEmpty(key))
        throw new ArgumentException();

    CspParameters cspp = new CspParameters { KeyContainerName = key };

    using (var rsa = new RSACryptoServiceProvider(cspp) { PersistKeyInCsp = true })
        return BitConverter.ToString(rsa.Encrypt(UTF8Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(source), true));
}


public static string Decrypt(this string source, string key)
{
    if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(source) || String.IsNullOrEmpty(key))
        throw new ArgumentException();

    try
    {
        CspParameters cspp = new CspParameters { KeyContainerName = key };

        using (var rsa = new RSACryptoServiceProvider(cspp) { PersistKeyInCsp = true })
        {
            string[] decryptArray = source.Split(new char[] { '-' }, StringSplitOptions.None);
            byte[] bytes = Array.ConvertAll<string, byte>(decryptArray, (s => Convert.ToByte(Byte.Parse(s, NumberStyles.HexNumber))));

            return UTF8Encoding.UTF8.GetString(rsa.Decrypt(bytes, true));
        }
    }
    catch
    { return null; }
}

How can I do?

share|improve this question
2  
"they don't work the way I want" is far too vague. Aside from the fact that you'd be better off using base64 instead of BitConverter.ToString, what's the problem with the current code? –  Jon Skeet May 10 '13 at 10:38
    
Please explain "has to work independently" and "they don't work the way I want". What do you think is the problem? –  Floris May 10 '13 at 10:39
    
The problem is that this algorithm do not work independently from a computer on which it is used. If a encrypt a string from my computer I can't decrypt the "result" from another computer. –  Nick May 10 '13 at 10:39
    
@JonSkeet Anyway why i have to use base64 instead of BitConverter.ToString? –  Nick May 10 '13 at 12:58
1  
@Nick: Well it uses 4 characters per 3 bytes, instead of 3 characters for every 1 byte - so there's less data to transmit. And converting it back to a byte array doesn't involve splitting it into one string per byte... it's just Convert.FromBase64String(text). –  Jon Skeet May 10 '13 at 13:06

1 Answer 1

The KeyContainerName is NOT the key. In your example above, by passing the key as the store name, you'll create a NEW RSA keypair on each machine with a store name of the key you passed in (rather than a storename of something like "MyRSAKeyPair" or whatever). This will mean both the public and private keys will be completely different and your routines won't seem to work.

ALSO: You're using asymmetric encryption, this has a maximum block size limit of the key length. This means you'll either need to create a chunking mechanism (slow as asymmetric encryption is expensive) OR use something symmetric like AES with the AES key being sent using asymmetric encryption (such as RSA) on a per conversation basis.

You need to export the RSA public key and then import it into the remote machine's keystore. Easier still is generating an X509 certificate (you can self sign if you're just going between a couple of machines, exporting the public part of it into a .CER file, then you can use the X509 Certificate Store API to get the RSA Provider, meaning you have a nice transportable key.

 public static RSACryptoServiceProvider GetRsaProviderFromCertificate()
 {
     X509Store store = new X509Store(StoreLocation.LocalMachine);
     store.Open(OpenFlags.ReadOnly | OpenFlags.OpenExistingOnly);
     X509Certificate2Collection certCollection =  (X509Certificate2Collection)store.Certificates;

     foreach(X509Certificate2 cert in certCollection)
     {
         if (cert.SubjectName.Name.IndexOf("TheCertIWantToUse") > 0)
         {
              return cert.PrivateKey as RSACryptoServiceProvider;
         }
     }

I hope that's explicit enough...

If you want to do it without certs

// Export public key (on the encrypting end)
            publicKey = rsaProvider.ToXmlString(false);
// Write public key to file
            publicKeyFile = File.CreateText(publicKeyFileName);
            publicKeyFile.Write(publicKey);   

Then on the other machine

            // Select target CSP
            cspParams = new CspParameters();
            cspParams.ProviderType = 1; // PROV_RSA_FULL 
            rsaProvider = new RSACryptoServiceProvider(cspParams);

            // Read public key from file
            publicKeyFile = File.OpenText(publicKeyFileName);
            publicKeyText = publicKeyFile.ReadToEnd();

            // Import public key
            rsaProvider.FromXmlString(publicKeyText);
share|improve this answer
    
I prefer not to use the file .CER. It is not important what kind of algorithm I use, but it have to be "portable". –  Nick May 10 '13 at 10:48
    
Well RSA is portable... But you have to import the public key into your keystore. See my edit using xml files –  Jeff Watkins May 10 '13 at 11:01
    
The second option is what I want, I'll try and if it works I'll give you my vote (and the correct answer of course). –  Nick May 10 '13 at 11:08
    
Please note my addendum about the limitations of using asymmetric encryption... Also, if this is to be a genuinely secure application, you may want to consider a signing and digest mechanism to ensure non repudiation. –  Jeff Watkins May 10 '13 at 11:13

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