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How come after the below code is executed, *p is still equal to 100? I would think that this should result in some sort of run time error because p is no longer pointing to the dynamic int variable?

int main()
{
    int *p = new int;
    //Release memory used by p
    *p=100;
    delete p;
    cout << "\np="<< *p;
}
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marked as duplicate by Mat, Shafik Yaghmour, Richard J. Ross III, billz, deepmax May 10 '13 at 12:10

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The compiler/os can do whatever it wants when you invoke that code, including making demon monkeys fly out your nose. Don't use that code! –  Richard J. Ross III May 10 '13 at 12:08

3 Answers 3

It's undefined behavior to access deleted pointer. It means anything could happen, pragmatic way is to set delete pointer to nullptr when use naked pointer;

delete p
p = nullptr;

Or

use smart pointer instead, then don't need to worry about when to release allocated memory block.

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In a lot of situations this isn't necessary, as you shouldn't probably be using new/delete at all. Use the C++11 (or boost) pointer types (shared_ptr, unique_ptr, and weak_ptr) instead. –  Richard J. Ross III May 10 '13 at 12:10
    
@RichardJ.RossIII yup. good point –  billz May 10 '13 at 12:12

Using p after the delete is undefined behavior. In practice what happens to *p depends on your compiler runtime.

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The primary concern of delete is not about freeing memory. It is rather about calling destructors deterministically, i.e. it is a general-purpose resource-freeing mechanism on the language level, the core aspect of C++ RAII.

The reason why you see that the value is still there, is platform-specific behavior, and is therefore not defined by the C++ standard. Standard does not say that after delete the target region of memory will be zeroed because it is platform-specific, and in fact most OSs out there will not do anything to that region of memory, not to waste additional CPU cycles. The OS usually simply marks the descriptor of that memory region as being free to use by other processes.

I want to emphasize that the process of freeing the memory is platform-specific. For instance, it is even platform-specific when the memory is actually freed. When you call delete there is no guarantee that OS immediately frees that memory region for other processes to use, it is more likely to happen asynchronously (when OS decides that it is the best time to do so).

The only thing that is defined by the standard is that destructors are guaranteed to be called in a deterministic way, so that on the language level (i.e. in the eyes of the program) the resources are freed, sockets are closed, buffers are flushed, and etc.

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No, the purpose of delete is to return memory to the OS. The destructor is a side-effect. –  Richard J. Ross III May 10 '13 at 12:10
    
It's the other way around from the point of view of C++. –  Haroogan May 10 '13 at 12:11
    
Please, show me where in the standard delete isn't supposed to return memory to the OS? –  Richard J. Ross III May 10 '13 at 12:11
1  
I didn't say that it is not supposed to free the memory, I'm emphasizing that the process of freeing the memory is platform-specific, furthermore, it is even platform-specific when the memory is actually freed. When you call delete no one guarantees that OS immediately frees that memory for other processes. The only thing that is defined by the standard is that destructors are guaranteed to be called in a deterministic way, so that on the language level (i.e. in the eyes of program) the resources are freed. –  Haroogan May 10 '13 at 12:15
    
Anyway, whoever downvoted this, has to think again whether he actually understands the C++ abstraction of resource-freeing. –  Haroogan May 10 '13 at 12:34

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