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What would be the most efficient way to write the following code in Perl:

my $index = 0;
foreach ( @spec ) {
    if ( $module =~ m/$_/ ) {
        splice(@spec, $index, 0, $module);
        last;         
    }
    $index++;
}

This works fine. Just seems a little wordy. The idea is that where I find a match for $module in the array I add an entry. I want to keep the array in a certain order and sorted.

i.e. if my array was [a,b,c,d] and my $module was 'c', I would want the result array to be [a,b,c,c,d].

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closed as off-topic by Quentin, jbabey, ikegami, innaM, Flimzy Dec 4 '13 at 15:28

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to be about programming within the scope defined in the help center." – Quentin, jbabey, ikegami, innaM
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
This sounds like it would be better suited to codereview.stackexchange.com –  Quentin May 10 '13 at 12:46
1  
Any optimizations are going to be micro at best.. there is nothing wrong with your program. –  user195488 May 10 '13 at 12:49
    
Are you simply doing an insert sort?? –  Axeman May 10 '13 at 13:16
    
Now found on codereview here –  ikegami May 10 '13 at 13:16
    
@0A0D - there's a difference between performance optimization (which is the root of all evil) and the readability optimization (which is Good) –  DVK May 10 '13 at 14:29
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3 Answers

You want "more efficient wordiness"??? I presume you're not asking for golfing, but for more readable code.

@spec = map { $_ eq $module ? ($_, $_) : $_ } @spec;
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http://perldoc.perl.org/perlsyn.html#For-Loops offers this wisdom:

If any part of LIST is an array, foreach will get very confused if you add or remove elements within the loop body, for example with splice. So don't do that.

If you must do that (and it isn't appropriate in this case), do it like this:

for ( my $index = 0; $index < @array; ++$index ) {
    my $elem = $array[$index];
    if ( ... ) {
        splice( @array, $index, 0, $elem );
        ++$index;
    }
}

or this:

for ( my $index = $#array; $index >= 0; --$index ) {
    my $elem = $array[$index];
    if ( ... ) {
        splice( @array, $index, 0, $elem );
    }
}
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Your code looks pretty much what I'd do except I'd be hesitant to manipulate an array while you're parsing through it with a for loop.

I would go through my array, find the position, then outside of the loop do the splice:

my $module_index;
for my $spec_index ( 0..$#spec ) {
    my $item = $spec[$spec_index];
    if ( $module =~ /$item/ ) {
        $module_index = $spec_index;
        last;
    }
}
splice (@spec, $module_index, 0, $module);

Note that I use the 0..$#spec to index through my array. This way, I don't have to increment my $module_index. There isn't anyway, using this syntax, to allow for $spec_index to have a value set from the loop itself. The choices are using while loop or using the C style syntax:

my $spec_index;
for ( $spec_index = 0; $spec_index <= $#spec; $spec_index++) {
    my $item = $spec[$spec_index];
    last if $module =~ /$item/;
}
splice (@spec, $spec_index, 0, $module);

However, the use of C style for loops is considered déclassé, or at least hard to maintain. According to Damian Conway (Perl Best Practices):

The three-part for statements that Perl inherits from C are needed only for unusual loop control behaviour, such as iterating by twos, or in an irregular sequence. But even in such cases, these C-style loops provide that unusual behaviour in an obscure and harder-to-maintain way.

There are ways to do this with map and grep which would take less typing, but I'm not sure whether they would be better. You already have an optimal answer with map, but can you look at it and tell without going through it what it's doing?

The question is one of support. What would happen if someone else looking at your code was trying to figure out what is going on?

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