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I have to convert a numpy array of floats to a string (to store in a SQL DB) and then also convert the same string back into a numpy float array.

This is how I'm going to a string (based on this article)

VIstring = ''.join(['%.5f,' % num for num in VI])
VIstring= VIstring[:-1] #Get rid of the last comma

So firstly this does work, is it a good way to go? Is their a better way to get rid of that last comma? Or can I get the join method to insert the commas for me?

Then secondly,more importantly, is there a clever way to get from the string back to a float array?

Here is an example of the array and the string:

VI
array([ 17.95024446,  17.51670904,  17.08894626,  16.66695611,
        16.25073861,  15.84029374,  15.4356215 ,  15.0367219 ,
        14.64359494,  14.25624062,  13.87465893,  13.49884988,
        13.12881346,  12.76454968,  12.40605854,  12.00293814,
        11.96379322,  11.96272486,  11.96142533,  11.96010489,
        11.95881595,  12.26924591,  12.67548634,  13.08158864,
        13.4877041 ,  13.87701221,  14.40238245,  14.94943786,
        15.49364166,  16.03681428,  16.5498035 ,  16.78362298,
        16.90331119,  17.02299387,  17.12193689,  17.09448654,
        17.00066063,  16.9300633 ,  16.97229868,  17.2169709 ,  17.75368411])

VIstring
'17.95024,17.51671,17.08895,16.66696,16.25074,15.84029,15.43562,15.03672,14.64359,14.25624,13.87466,13.49885,13.12881,12.76455,12.40606,12.00294,11.96379,11.96272,11.96143,11.96010,11.95882,12.26925,12.67549,13.08159,13.48770,13.87701,14.40238,14.94944,15.49364,16.03681,16.54980,16.78362,16.90331,17.02299,17.12194,17.09449,17.00066,16.93006,16.97230,17.21697,17.75368'

Oh yes and the loss of precision from the %.5f is totally fine, these values are interpolated by the original points only have 4 decimal place precision so I don't need to beat that. So when recovering the numpy array, I'm happy to only get 5 decimal place precision (obviously I suppose)

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1  
You might check out the numpy savetxt and loadtxt functions –  Matt May 10 '13 at 13:13
    
@MattAnderson Is there a way to use those to put the text straight into strings and load it straight out of strings in memory rather than using files? –  Dan May 10 '13 at 13:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

First you should use join this way to avoid the last comma issue:

VIstring = ','.join(['%.5f' % num for num in VI])

Then to read it back, use numpy.fromstring:

np.fromstring(VIstring, sep=',')
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect, thanks! –  Dan May 10 '13 at 13:15
>>> import numpy  as np
>>> from cStringIO import StringIO
>>> VI = np.array([ 17.95024446,  17.51670904,  17.08894626,  16.66695611,
        16.25073861,  15.84029374,  15.4356215 ,  15.0367219 ,
        14.64359494,  14.25624062,  13.87465893,  13.49884988,
        13.12881346,  12.76454968,  12.40605854,  12.00293814,
        11.96379322,  11.96272486,  11.96142533,  11.96010489,
        11.95881595,  12.26924591,  12.67548634,  13.08158864,
        13.4877041 ,  13.87701221,  14.40238245,  14.94943786,
        15.49364166,  16.03681428,  16.5498035 ,  16.78362298,
        16.90331119,  17.02299387,  17.12193689,  17.09448654,
        17.00066063,  16.9300633 ,  16.97229868,  17.2169709 ,  17.75368411])
>>> s = StringIO()
>>> np.savetxt(s, VI, fmt='%.5f', newline=",")
>>> s.getvalue()
'17.95024,17.51671,17.08895,16.66696,16.25074,15.84029,15.43562,15.03672,14.64359,14.25624,13.87466,13.49885,13.12881,12.76455,12.40606,12.00294,11.96379,11.96272,11.96143,11.96010,11.95882,12.26925,12.67549,13.08159,13.48770,13.87701,14.40238,14.94944,15.49364,16.03681,16.54980,16.78362,16.90331,17.02299,17.12194,17.09449,17.00066,16.93006,16.97230,17.21697,17.75368,'
>>> np.fromstring(s.getvalue(), sep=',')
array([ 17.95024,  17.51671,  17.08895,  16.66696,  16.25074,  15.84029,
        15.43562,  15.03672,  14.64359,  14.25624,  13.87466,  13.49885,
        13.12881,  12.76455,  12.40606,  12.00294,  11.96379,  11.96272,
        11.96143,  11.9601 ,  11.95882,  12.26925,  12.67549,  13.08159,
        13.4877 ,  13.87701,  14.40238,  14.94944,  15.49364,  16.03681,
        16.5498 ,  16.78362,  16.90331,  17.02299,  17.12194,  17.09449,
        17.00066,  16.93006,  16.9723 ,  17.21697,  17.75368])
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ah, set the string as the file buffer...way to go. Knew there should be some clever way there –  Matt May 10 '13 at 13:24
    
This is pretty similar to method 5 from the link I posted, I suppose I should have noticed it. Thanks. I'm going to stick with Boud's method probably –  Dan May 10 '13 at 13:48
    
@Dan not really since all of the operations in my code are performed at the C level so It's likely to be faster, also it avoids reinventing the wheel by using numpy functions. –  jamylak May 10 '13 at 13:52

If you want some string representation whatsoever (not necessarily CSV), you could try this, which I have been using:

import numpy, json

## arr is some numpy.ndarray
s = json.dumps(arr.tolist())
arrback = numpy.array(json.loads(s))

It works for most common datatypes.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 This is pretty cool, especially if you need to keep the precision. –  Dan May 10 '13 at 13:40

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