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I would like to reproduce the following logo, add a shadow below one letter as in the Probe Logo using only CSS.

How to do it as box-shadow overflow on both side of the letter ? I would prefer to avoid having an extra <span class="shadow"></span> following my "hovering" letter but manage it only with the letter tag/CSS rule (see HTML below).

N.B.: I'm aware of jQuery / CSS3 Animated shadow effect.

HTML

<span>Pr<span class="text-info">o</span>be</span>

CSS

element.style {
    box-shadow: 0 4px 3px #AAAAAA;
    position: relative;
    top: -3px;
}
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I don't think you can do it without another element because you can't decrease the shadow's width relative to the entire span, but you could do it with a pseudoelement if that's better: jsfiddle.net/Xysax/1 –  Explosion Pills May 10 '13 at 13:32
    
I would do this with another image. easy and effective. –  Core May 10 '13 at 13:42
    
As FYI: I have updated the solution, here is a link: jsfiddle.net/v9k6Q –  Alex Bell May 10 '13 at 14:49
    
Both solutions exhibit similar issues: - shadow appear on 3 sides. The shadow below the letter is truncated on top giving an akward look. –  Édouard Lopez May 11 '13 at 11:53

2 Answers 2

Using pseudo-elements (:before and :after), :hover and opacity properties, the solution looks like the following (it can be extended w/animation effects on opacity)

HTML

<div class="text-effects"><span>Pr<span class="text-info">o</span>be</span></div>

CSS

body {
    font-size: 10em;
    font-family: Arial;
}

div.text-effects {
    text-transform:uppercase;
}

span.text-info {
    position: relative;
    cursor:pointer;
}

.text-info:hover {
    color: #008080;
    bottom: 0.1em;
}

span.text-info:before {
    content: ".";
    color: transparent;
    position: absolute;
    width: 40%;
    box-shadow: 0 5px 4px -4px #303030;
    display: block;
    left: 30%;
    bottom: 1em;
    opacity:0;
}
span.text-info:after {
    content: ".";
    color: transparent;
    position: absolute;
    bottom: 0;
    width: 40%;
    box-shadow: 0 5px 4px -4px #303030;
    display: block;
    left: 30%;
    bottom:0.15em;
    opacity:0;
}

span.text-info:hover:before{
    opacity:1;
}

span.text-info:hover:after{
    opacity:1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Maybe I express myself badly, I don't want the effect on-mouse-over but a shadow below the letter in a similar fashion as if it was hovering a few cm above the ground –  Édouard Lopez May 11 '13 at 11:48
    
In this case, if I understand correctly, you can remove all that :hover events and also remove opacity:0; Then adjust the bottom:1em; property of the pseudo-element :before per your requirement. –  Alex Bell May 11 '13 at 11:59
    
Yep, the pseudo-element hint was what I was missing, see my answer. –  Édouard Lopez May 11 '13 at 12:37
    
That's OK. Hope it works for you now. Rgds, –  Alex Bell May 11 '13 at 12:39
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Technique

  • I had to use pseudo-element as described by @Alex Bell.
  • But instead of box-shadow I use text-shadow and tweak the pseudo-element position.
  • pseudo-element text is ˍ aka U+02CD MODIFIER LETTER LOW MACRON (&#717; or \u02CD)

Final result is available as a fiddle.

HTML

<div class="text-effects">
    <span>Pr<span class="text-info">o</span>be</span>
</div>

CSS

body {
    font-size: 10em;
    font-family: Arial;
}

div.text-effects {
    text-transform:uppercase;
}

span.text-info {
    position: relative;
    color: #008080;
    bottom: 0.1em;
    width: 1em;
    height: 1em;
}

span.text-info:after {
    bottom: 0.15em;
    color: transparent;
    content: "ˍ";
    display: block;
    font-size: 120px !important;
    height: 1em;
    left: 26%;
    position: absolute;
    text-shadow: 0 0 11px #999;
    width: 1em;
}
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