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I would like to implement some protocol as a class template with raw_write and raw_read functions as template arguments. Both raw functions has strictly defined interfaces:

int raw_write(uint8_t *src, size_t len);
int raw_read(uint8_t *dst, size_t maxlen);

Is it any way to control this interface with compilation error when somebody tries to pass for example:

int raw_write2(uint16_t *src, size_t len);

Should I pass template arguments as objects of specified type or as a type name instantiated inside template realization?

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2  
if you're only accepting one argument type, what's the use of templating it ? –  Sander De Dycker May 10 '13 at 14:41
2  
@SanderDeDycker I was a bit confused myself, but I think he wants a class template that will hold some object callable with the specified signature. But it could be a function pointer, a functor, a lambda, ... as long as it has the right signature. So std::function is probably the answer in some form. –  BoBTFish May 10 '13 at 14:43
    
@BoBTFish : looks like you're right - reading the title too, and not just the body helps :-) –  Sander De Dycker May 10 '13 at 14:48
1  
Could you give an example of how you want this to be used or NOT to be used? This is confusing me a bit, even after other users' explanations –  Andy Prowl May 10 '13 at 14:52
    
SanderDeDycker: You're right. I would like to be able to pass any callable with strictly controlled signature. –  ardabro May 10 '13 at 14:56
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can do this with SFINAE and some traits classes.

I suspect the best way to do it is to expect a functor that is call-compatible -- this also happens to be easier.

#include <utility>
#include <type_traits>
template<typename T, bool=true>
struct raw_write_compatible: std::false_type {};
template<typename T, bool=true>
struct raw_read_compatible: std::false_type {};
template<typename T>
struct raw_write_compatible<
  T,
  std::is_convertable<
    decltype(
      std::declval<T&>()(
        std::declval<uint8_t *>(),
        std::declval<size_t>()
      )
    ),
    int
  >::value
>: std::true_type {};
template<typename T>
struct raw_read_compatible<
  T,
  std::is_convertable<
    decltype(
      std::declval<T&>()(
        std::declval<uint8_t *>(),
        std::declval<size_t>()
      )
    ),
    int
  >::value
>: std::true_type {};

The point of these is that raw_read_compatible< T >::value is true iff an instance of T can be evaluated by with the signature (uint8_t*, size_t), and the return type can be converted to an int.

( As an aside, your "write" function signature probably should take a pointer to const uint8_t, because it doesn't modify that parameter. )

You'd use this like this:

template<typename Reader, typename Writer>
typename std::enable_if<
  raw_read_compatible<Reader>::value && raw_write_compatible<Writer>::value,
  bool // return value of do_some_io_stuff
>::type do_some_io_stuff( Reader const& reader, Writer const& writer ) {
  return true;
}

and do_some_io_stuff will match iff reader/writer can be called in the way you want.

This has the advantage that do_some_io_stuff fails to match when you try to pass in an incompatible lambda or function pointer or functor, instead of matching and then failing to compile. In theory, that lets you override things.

The above solution requires a compiler with decent C++11 support: MSVC2012 doesn't work with the above, for example (it lacks "expression SFINAE" in its words).

A simpler solution would be to just take a std::function< int(uint8_t*, size_t) >, but that has two costs: first, it has a run time cost at each invocation (roughly equivalent to a virtual method call -- so not that high when compared to io) -- the real cost being blocking optimization over the function-call boundary. Second you can get some failure to compile instead of failure to match the signature errors in my experience (I'm not sure if the C++11 standard has specified that std::function's "lambda" constructor should only match when passed a compatible type, but I think I've seen implementations that fail that test).

The advantage of the std::function solution is that it is much simpler, it allows putting the implementation in a separate file, and the intent is easier to understand.

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I'm really impressed with this solution! –  ardabro May 10 '13 at 15:12
    
@ardabro thanks. It would be better if I wrote or found a "is signature compatible" traits class: something like is_signature_compatible< int(uint8_t*,size_t), T >::value. –  Yakk May 10 '13 at 17:46
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I think this is the desired (or at least a) solution using std::function to store the callable (not requiring a used defined template class):

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>

struct protocol_callbacks
{
    using func_t = std::function<int(uint8_t*, size_t)>;

    protocol_callbacks(func_t a_reader, func_t a_writer) :
        reader(a_reader),
        writer(a_writer) {}
    func_t reader;
    func_t writer;
};

int writer(uint8_t*, size_t) { return 0; }
int reader(uint8_t*, size_t) { return 0; }

int bad_writer(uint16_t*, size_t) { return 0; }

int main ()
{
    protocol_callbacks pc1(reader, writer);
    protocol_callbacks pc2([](uint8_t*, size_t) { return 0; },
                           [](uint8_t*, size_t) { return 0; });
    //protocol_callbacks pc3(bad_writer, reader);
}

Use of bad_writer causes a compilation failure (without bad_writer http://ideone.com/hG7tqc and with bad_writer http://ideone.com/roMJgM).

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Good and simple. No templates necessary. Thanks. –  ardabro May 10 '13 at 15:13
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