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Is it possible to get a list of functions in a certain namespace or all functions in a program at runtime?

I have a function pointer map and I need to add commands on my own to it, but I thought: why not create a namespace and let the program do the work at runtime?

something like(pseudocode):

typedef bool (*command)(void);
namespace Commands
{
    bool Start(void)
    {
        return true;
    }
    bool End(void)
    {
        return true;
    }
};
std::map<std::string,command> CommandMap;
main()
{
    for(each function in namespace Commands)
    {
        CommandMap[std::string(function_name)] = function;
    }
    CommandMap["Start"]();
    CommandMap["End"]();
    return 0;
}

instead of

std::map<std::string,command> CommandMap;
main()
{
    CommandMap["Start"] = Commands::Start;
    CommandMap["End"] = Commands::End;
    //list of thousands of other commands......
    CommandMap["Start"]();
    CommandMap["End"]();
    return 0;
}

Is this possible to achieve in C++ or C++11? Or any alternatives to my goal?

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1  
No.🍌🍌🍌🍌🍌🍌 –  R. Martinho Fernandes May 10 '13 at 14:49
    
C++ has no reflection mechanism. –  Haroogan May 10 '13 at 14:50
    
I dunno your intent, but it seems like a switch would be better than a map. –  Pubby May 10 '13 at 14:53
    
Wouldn't each function need to have the same parameter and return types? –  John May 10 '13 at 14:53
1  
Consider each command as a derived class from a Command type. If each derived type has an instantiation as a static, then it's constructor could register it with a singleton CommandCollection class, or something like that, that can keep the list. –  John May 10 '13 at 14:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Consider something like:

class CommandCollection
{
   ...
   void register_command(Command*, string);
   map<string, Command*> m_command_map;
}

class Command
{
   ...
   virtual do_command(...) = 0;
}

class EachCommand : public Command
{
   EachCommand() { CommandCollection::instance().register_command(this, my_name); }
   ...
   virtual do_command(...);
}

EachCommand each_command_inst;

The Command base class has a virtual to do a command. Each derived type implements the command (you could try overloading the () operator to make them look more like functions). Each derived Command registers itself with the CommandCollection, so it can be known in a central location. If you want to associate the commands by string (seems good if a user is typing them in), then that would be the key in the map.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks you, here is what I made from it: ideone.com/6tVIWh shame I have to make two macros for one command instead of one, but I'm okay with that. if you have any suggestion on how to imrpove it they're welcome :) –  user1182183 May 10 '13 at 21:37
    
CommandCollection should be a singleton style class: Private constructor, private static self-pointer, new instance on first call to member function instance(). –  John May 10 '13 at 21:42
    
You don't need the concatenation macros with what you are trying to concatenate and how you are calling the CMD and CMDEND macros. You should be fine just using ## inside their definitions. The double macro concatenation is when you need to concatenate expanded entities, but you are concatenating direct arguments with string literals. Essentially, the concatenation you are doing isn't fancy enough to need the double CAT macro idiom. –  John May 10 '13 at 21:48

No (it has to be 30 characters).

EDIT: This goes along with my comment about how much control you have. You could redefine all of your functions as functors, and have the constructor register itself with some array. Your base class would look like this:

EDIT2: read the comment about all functions having same arguments and return types, makes it a little cleaner.

class myFunctorBaseClass
{
public:
    myFunctorClass () :  {//register myself, no duplicates}
    virtual int operator () (int);//Whatever types you want
};

class myFunctor: public myFunctorBaseClass  //Define as many of these as you need
{
public:

    int operator() (int y) { return y; } // Define this as whatever you want
}

This obviously would depend on the objects being constucted, but assuming they all were as an initialization step, this would get you what you want.

NOTE: This may be incomplete/not compile. I just kinda wrote this off the top of my head, but it should be close. The reference you want is "functors" if you have questions about how this works.

share|improve this answer
    
also no alternatives? –  user1182183 May 10 '13 at 14:50
3  
The alternative is doing it by hand... –  R. Martinho Fernandes May 10 '13 at 14:51
    
It depends on what level of control you have. If you're talking listing items from a library that you only have objects and headers for, the answer is literally "no". Otherwise you could add the names to an array of some kind, or have them "register" themselves, but that would require them to be called once. I suppose you could do something really wierd with a vector of structs containing function pointers and strings, and... NO, just... NO. –  ChrisCM May 10 '13 at 14:52

As mentioned elsewhere, names (in C and C++, other languages may/do differ on this point) only really exist as part of the source-code. Once compiled, the names cease to have any meaning in C and C++.

One could, however, consider some sort of structure like this:

 class CommandBase
 {
     virtual bool doCommand() = 0;
     virtual std::string name() = 0;
     virtual ~CommandBase() {}
 };

 class StartCommand : public CommandBase
 {
     bool doCommand() {  ...; return true }
     std::string name() { return "Start"; }
 };

 void RegisterCommand(CommandBase *cmd)
 {
     CommandMap[cmd->name] = cmd;
 }

 ...
 StartCommand start;
 ...
 void someFunction()
 {
    RegisterCommand(&start);
 }

I'll probably get a downvote for mentioning macros, because these are evil - don't use this if you are a purist that don't like macros.

 #define CMD(x) CommandMap[#x] = Command::x

 CMD(start);
 CMD(end);

There are certainly other variants, and someone who knows templates may well come up with something that does this using templates.

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