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#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct {
    char **str_array;
} TYPE;

int main () {
    TYPE foo;

    f (foo);

    printf ("> %s\n", foo.str_array[0]);

    free (foo.str_array[0]);
    return 0;
}

void f (TYPE *tp) {
    tp->str_array[0] = calloc (10, sizeof(char)); // Seg Fault
    strcpy (tp->str_array[0], "text");
}

I'm sorry because i can't add some more details but i have no idea. Any help will be appreciated.

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1  
Does that even compile? With f() taking a pointer, but getting an instance? –  nvoigt May 10 '13 at 14:55
    
That's not the real code... is it? –  Mike May 10 '13 at 14:56
    
first try to allocate memory for str_array. –  akhil May 10 '13 at 15:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are a number of problems here, but I suspect this is not your actual code, and the real code's problem is here:

char **str_array;
...
tp->str_array[0] = calloc (10, sizeof(char)); 

Your TYPE structure has a member str_array which is a pointer to a pointer to char.

By calling str_array[0] you are actually doing the first level of dereferencing but that was never allocated anything. Hence the seg fault.

You need to first allocate some memeory to the str_array, then to str_array[0]

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You need to first allocate something for the array of pointers:

tp->str_array = calloc (10, sizeof(char*));
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I don't think this is your compiling example. foo is declared as TYPE, but passed as TYPE *. You're probably defining foo as TYPE * and passing an uninitialized pointer, when you should pass the address of an object allocated on the stack, as in &foo.

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Your function f() takes a pointer to TYPE but your call f(foo) passes foo by value rather than by reference

You need to call f(&foo);

In C, the ampersand (&)gives the address of a variable.

Your main function should look like this:

int main (void) {
    TYPE foo;

    f (&foo);

    printf ("> %s\n", foo.str_array[0]);

    free (foo.str_array[0]);
    return 0;
}

Also, unless you provide a function prototype for f() before main(), the compiler will assume it returns an int and that its arguments are of type int so put void f (TYPE *tp); (with the semicolon) above main() or paste the whole function above main() - thus:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
typedef struct {
    char **str_array;
} TYPE;

void f (TYPE *tp) {
    tp->str_array[0] = calloc (10, sizeof(char));
    strcpy (tp->str_array[0], "text");
}

int main (void) {
    TYPE foo;
    f (&foo);
    printf ("> %s\n", foo.str_array[0]);

    free (foo.str_array[0]);
    return 0;
}

note: There are only two valid definitions of main():

int main(void)

int main(int argc, char ** argv)

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