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I have the following data array, with 2 million entries:

[20965  1239   296   231    -1    -1 20976  1239   299   314   147   337
   255   348    -1    -1 20978  1239   136   103   241   154    27   293
    -1    -1 20984  1239    39   161   180   184    -1    -1 20990  1239
   291    31   405    50   569   357    -1    -1 20997  1239   502    25
   176   215   360   281    -1    -1 21004  1239    -1    -1 21010  1239
   286   104   248   252    -1    -1 21017  1239   162    38   331   240
   368   363   321   412    -1    -1 21024  1239   428   323    -1    -1
 21030  1239    -1    -1 21037  1239   325    28   353   102   477   189
   366   251   143   452 ... ect

This array contains x,y coordinates of photons on a CCD chip, I want to go through the array and add up all these photon events in a matrix with dimensions equal to the CCD chip.

The formatting is as follows: number number x0 y0 x1 y1 -1 -1. The two number entries I don't care too much about, the x0 y0 ect. is what I want to get out. The -1 entries is a delimiter indicating a new frame, after these there is always the 2 'number' entries again.

I have made this code, which does work:

i = 2
pixels = np.int32(data_height)*np.int32(data_width)
data = np.zeros(pixels).reshape(data_height, data_width)

while i < len(rdata):
    x = rdata[i]
    y = rdata[i+1]

    if x != -1 and y != -1:
        data[y,x] = data[y,x] + 1
        i = i + 2
    elif x == -1 and y == -1:
        i = i + 4
    else:
        print "something is wrong"
        print i
        print x
        print y

rdata is my orignal array. data is the resulting matrix which starts out with only zeroes. The while loop starts at the first x coord, at index 2 and then if it finds two consecutive -1 entries it will skip four entries.

The script works fine, but it does take 7 seconds to run. How can I speed up this script? I am a beginner with python, and from the hardest way to learn python I know that while loops should be avoided, but rewriting to a for loop is even slower!

for i in range(2, len(rdata), 2):

    x = rdata[i]
    y = rdata[i+1]

    if x != -1 and y != -1:
        px = rdata[i-2]
        py = rdata[i-1]

        if px != -1 and py != -1:
            data[y,x] = data[y,x] + 1

Maybe someone can think of a faster method, something along the lines of np.argwhere(rdata == -1) and use this output to extract the locations of the x and y coordinates?


Update: Thanks for all answers!

I used askewchan's method to conserve frame information, however, as my data file is 300000 frames long I get a memory error when I try to generate a numpy array with dimensions (300000, 640, 480). I could get around this by making a generator object:

def bindata(splits, h, w, data):

    f0=0
    for i,f in enumerate(splits):
        flat_rdata = np.ravel_multi_index(tuple(data[f0:f].T)[::-1], (h, w))
        dataslice = np.zeros((w,h), dtype='h')
        dataslice = np.bincount(flat_rdata, minlength=pixels).reshape(h, w)
        f0 = f
        yield dataslice

I then make a tif from the array using a modified version of Gohlke's tifffile.py to generate a tiff file from the data. It works fine, but I need to figure out a way to compress the data as the tiff file is >4gb (at this point the script crashes). I have very sparse arrays, 640*480 all zeros with some dozen ones per frame, the original data file is 4MB so some compression should be possible.

share|improve this question
    
Do you need to keep track of the frame number? –  askewchan May 10 '13 at 15:12
    
At the moment not, but in the end I would like to make a tiff stack movie, then I will need the frame number. –  xyzzyqed May 10 '13 at 15:34
    
OK, my answer preserves frame number now. –  askewchan May 10 '13 at 18:07
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Sounds like all you want is to do some boolean indexing magic to get rid of the invalid frame stuff, and then of course add the pixels up.

rdata = rdata.reshape(-1, 2)
mask = (rdata != -1).all(1)

# remove every x, y pair that is after a pair with a -1.
mask[1:][mask[:-1] == False] = False
# remove first x, y pair
mask[0] = False

rdata = rdata[mask]

# Now need to use bincount, [::-1], since you use data[y,x]:
flat_rdata = np.ravel_multi_index(tuple(rdata.T)[::-1], (data_height, data_width))

res = np.bincount(flat_rdata, minlength=data_height * data_width)
res = res.reshape(data_height, data_width)
share|improve this answer
    
Works, it now takes 0.2 seconds :). I did have to switch around data_height and data_width and transpose the final result to get what I want. I do have trouble understanding what ravel_multi_index exactly does, could you explain it? –  xyzzyqed May 10 '13 at 15:49
1  
Yeah, just noticed, added a [::-1], but however is fine. your rdata are x, y coordinates (or y, x). But np.bincount can only use flat integers, so it converts the x, y coordinates into the coordinates into a 1-d array of the same size. –  seberg May 10 '13 at 15:50
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Use this to remove the -1s and numbers:

rdata = np.array("20965  1239   296   231    -1    -1 20976  1239   299   314   147   337 255   348    -1    -1 20978  1239   136   103   241   154    27   293 -1    -1 20984  1239    39   161   180   184    -1    -1 20990  1239 291    31   405    50   569   357    -1    -1 20997  1239   502    25 176   215   360   281    -1    -1 21004  1239    -1    -1 21010  1239 286   104   248   252    -1    -1 21017  1239   162    38   331   240 368   363   321   412    -1    -1 21024  1239   428   323    -1    -1 21030  1239    -1    -1 21037  1239   325    28   353   102   477   189 366   251   143   452".split(), dtype=int)

rdata = rdata.reshape(-1,2)
splits = np.where(np.all(rdata==-1, axis=1))[0]
nonxy = np.hstack((splits,splits+1))
data = np.delete(rdata, nonxy, axis=0)[1:]

Now, using part of @seberg's method to convert the x-y lists into arrays, you can make a 3D array where each 'layer' is a frame:

nf = splits.size + 1            # number of frames
splits -= 1 + 2*np.arange(nf-1) # account for missing `-1`s and `number`s
datastack = np.zeros((nf,h,w))
f0 = 0                          # f0 = start of the frame
for i,f in enumerate(splits):   # f  = end of the frame
    flat_data = np.ravel_multi_index(tuple(data[f0:f].T)[::-1], (h, w))
    datastack[i] = np.bincount(flat_rdata, minlength=h*w).reshape(h, w)
    f0 = f

Now, datastack[i] is a 2D array showing the ith frame of your data.

share|improve this answer
    
-5 and 3 also add up to -2, you have to be careful with that kind of stuff... –  Jaime May 10 '13 at 15:44
    
Thanks @Jaime, could be dangerous to assume all the coordinates and "numbers" are positive. –  askewchan May 10 '13 at 16:52
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if x0, y0, x1, y1 != -1 could you not do something like filter(lambda a: a != -1, rdata) and then not bother with the ifs? that could speed your code up.

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